Artis 2017 Entries – University of Copenhagen

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Artis 2017 Entries

The entries for the ARTiS Contest 2017.


01 - Nothing better than a smiling face

by Jannicke Wiik-Nielsen

The image shows the parasitic bed bug, Cimex lectularis. This is the best known beg bug as it feed on human blood. The name derives from its preferred habitat, a warm cozy bed. Coloured scanning electron micrograph. Magnification: x100 when printed at 10cm wide.
I'm a researcher at the Norwegian Veterinary Institute. The institute uses my images in different communication contexts and supplies the images to Science Photo Library.

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02 - Erotic art

by Jannicke Wiik-Nielsen

Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a dog flea antenna. The fleas particularly live on domestic dogs and cats, but may occasionally bite humans. The fleas have antennae on both sides of their head. These are delicate sense organs which play a significant role in host-finding and are crucial for successful mating. They contain disc-shaped clasping organs which secretes an adhesive, glue-like substance. With erect antennae, the male flea moves towards a female until their heads contact each other. He then uses his antenna to push the female’s abdomen up until he is underneath her and then uses his claws to grab onto the female’s legs during mating. Magnification: x950 when printed at 10cm wide.
I'm a researcher at the Norwegian Veterinary Institute. The institute uses my images in different communication contexts and supplies the images to Science Photo Library.

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03 - Chrysemys Scripta Elegans

by Jean-Francois Perrier

The red ear turtle (Chrysemys Scripta Elegans) is an invasive specie in Europe. It can reach a size of 50 cm. Because of its exceptional resistance to anoxia, it is commonly used to make in vitro preparations for studying the physiology of the central nervous system. This model was used to elucidate the cellular mechanism of the motor fatigue that occurs in the central nervous system. Picture taken by Jean-François Perrier, Associate professor at the University of Copenhagen.

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04 - Scratching

by Robertas Guzulaitis

Turtles have been used to study neural networks of spinal cord because of high resistance to anoxia i.e. lack of oxygen. Turtles perform rhythmic limb movements called scratching to remove an irritant from the body surface. Here you can see a time-lapse image of turtle hing-limb during scratching.
I am a postdoc at University of Copenhagen.

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05 - Broken heart of gold

by Morten Meldal

The image shows us the aging heart of gold, so pleased with its own goodness, that it bust into pieces and could never heal again.

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06 - Dragons eye

by Morten Meldal

We are looking at extremely regular polymer micro-particles selforganizing into what looks like a close up of a dragons eye.

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07 - Recurrent Symmetry

by Alberto Viñas

It is only in the illuminating light of science, that the universe reveals its astonishing symmetry. The image evokes structures reminiscent of the atomic, molecular or even celestial scale...but we are looking at nothing but microdroplets in a macroscopically isotropic crude oil/water emulsion. It is only in the light of the microscope that its internal structure is unravelled.
-Alberto Viñas, University of Copenhagen

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08 - Carbon Matrix

by Hugo Russell

A magnified image of Impregnated, spherical, active carbon adsorbent particles mounted on a polyurethane foam. This forms part of an advanced nitrogen oxide filter that aims to efficiently adsorb NOx (reactive nitrogen oxides) pollution without obstructing airflow and could be used to protect schools from harmful NOx pollution in urban environments.

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09 - Imaging and imagination

by Anna Müller

1) A CT scan of the chest of a dog, aqcuried just behind the heart. The image shows the lungs and main blood vessels. The body wall surrounds the lungs.
2) The image covers the whole chest of the dog.
3) The CT image has been manipulated with a filter using neural networks, a kind of artificial intelligence method, to identify and enhance patterns in the image. It was all done automatically.
4) My research is about combining diagnostic images and artificial intelligence techniques. So I enjoyed the idea of using artificial intelligence for manipulation of the image.
5) Anna Müller, PhD-student in veterinary diagnostic imaging at the University Hospital for Companion Animals at the University of Copenhagen.

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10 - Beauty in seawater

by Jannicke Wiik-Nielsen

Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of the hydroid, Echtopleura larynx. The hydroid is a fouling organism usually found attached to sunken ropes, floating buoys, mussel shells, rocks and seaweed. The hydroid has two distinct rings of tentacles, one around its mouth and the other at the base of the head. In between the two rings of tentacles, are the gonophores, or the sexual buds. The hydroids are beautiful but beware; their delicate looks belie their potent nature. They possess an armament of stinging cells equipped with nematocysts in their tentacles used to capture and subdue prey. Magnification: x20 when printed at 10cm wide.
I'm a researcher at the Norwegian Veterinary Institute. The institute uses my images in different communication contexts and supplies the images to Science Photo Library.

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11 - Guernica of cells

by Elena Bertseva

Fibroblast cells in artistic post-processing.
Epi-fluorescent microscope Leica dm5500.

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12 - The Cell

by Johannes Holm

This is a fluorescence microscopy image of mammalian cells, each about 10 micrometers wide. The image is made using a technique called laser scanning confocal microscopy, which allows the scientist to look at only a thin section of the cell at a time, while the cell is alive. To visualise the cells in the fluorescence microscope the DNA, mitochondria and actin has been labeled with differently coloured fluorescent molecules. We can clearly see that the DNA (blue) is located inside the nucleus of the cells. The mitochondria (red) which are the organelles that produce energy for the cells are scattered all around. And finally the actin protein (green) is seen as filaments inside the cell like the structutal beams of a house.
The image was taken during a course on confocal microscopy. I have done a tiny bit of post-processing on the image to make it even more beautiful.
Johannes Holm
Ph.d. student at the nanoscience center
Copenhagen university

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13 - Malet i sten

by Magnus August Ravn Harding

Dette billede viser fordelingen af kalk (rød) og ler (grøn) i et fossil fra samlingerne på Geologisk Museum. Billedet fortæller en omtrent 60 millioner år gammel historie fra det vestlige Grønland. Dengang voksede hér både løv- og nåletræer, herunder blandt andet denne Taxodium. Billedet vidner om en detaljeret kalkkrystallisation af hver eneste celle i det ældgamle blad og viser hvordan organismer kan bevares i sten gennem millioner af år. Således kan for længst uddøde dyr og planter samt deres levesteder efterfølgende studeres.
Billedet blev taget med time-of-flight secondary-ion-mass-spectrometry (TOF SIMS). Fossilets overflade blev bombarderet af Bismuth-ioner, som frigjorde atomer fra de øverste få nanometer af fossilet, som dernæst kunne identificeres. Hele billedet måler 5x5 millimeter.
Mit navn er Magnus Harding. Kion Norrman fra DTU Risø hjalp mig med at tage billedet til brug i mit bachelorprojekt, som jeg skriver under vejledning af Tais W. Dahl fra SNM.

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14 - Invisible Universe

by Mariya Zhukova

Infections caused by parasitic flatworms of the family Opistorchiidae remain a major public health problem in Asia and Europe. These parasites coexist with their host for a long time and cause severe clinical complications including liver cancer. The image displays a cross-section through the gut of Opisthorchis felineus, a representative of the family Opistorchiidae, which infects the liver in mammals. The image was taken with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and artificially colored. We studied feeding habits of the parasite. Black crystals in the gut lumen are hemozoin (size of crystals 50 nm - 2.5 µm), a disposal product formed from the digestion of blood. The image was obtained by Mariya Zhukova when she worked at the Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Novosibirsk, Russia.

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15 - Colour in the detail

by Martin C. Holding

The picture shows a thin section of the foliation found in a biotite schist viewed at 1x magnification. The thin section is taken from a metamorphic rock, which is evident through the "fans" of smaller quartz crystals flowing out from either side of the main quarz crystal in the middle. The colourful crystals on the sides are biotite crystals, as seen in their cleavage and colours.
The main quartz crystal is approx. 2 mm in length.
The photo is taken with a DSLR camera viewed through a cross-polerisation microscope at Luleå Tekniska Universitet as part of the work for my master thesis.
The rock specimen originates from Svappavaara open pit iron mine in Northern Sweden.
I have since graduated from there, with a MSc from LTU and a BSc in Geology-Geoscience from KU.

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16 - Thin rotational beauty

by Martin C. Holding

The picture shows a thin section of the foliation found in a biotite schist viewed at 5x magnification. The thin section is taken from a metamorphic rock, which is evident through the ""fans"" of smaller quartz crystals flowing out from either side of the main quarz crystal in the middle. The colourful crystals on the sides are biotite crystals, as seen in their cleavage and colours. The main quartz crystal is approx. 2 mm in length.
The photo is taken with a DSLR camera viewed through a cross-polerisation microscope at Luleå Tekniska Universitet as part of the work for my master thesis.
The rock specimen originates from Svappavaara open pit iron mine in Northern Sweden.
I have since graduated from there, with a MSc from LTU and a BSc in Geology-Geoscience from KU.

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17 - Let’s shed (polarized) light on a tongue

by Laure Plantard

This is a longitudinal section of a tongue seen in polarized light microscopy showing the muscles of the tongue in blue and yellow. No staining is needed; the colours come from the interaction between the polarised light and the tissue. When looking at the striation of the muscles (brighter bands parallel to one another in a muscle – distant of around 2.7µm in average), you can see that the muscles appearing blue are at a 90°C angle compared to the ones appearing yellow. The difference in orientation leads to the difference in colour. The black shapes are cell nuclei. The width of the picture is 688µm.
This sample is used for teaching purposes at the Core Facility for Integrated Microscopy (CFIM), SUND, University of Copenhagen. My name is Laure Plantard, I am a cell biologist, specialised in microscopy."

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18 - CGG

by Carlos Gómez Guijarro

This composition of pictures displays a merger of galaxies 100,000 light years across just 1Gyr after the Big Bang. The images were taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (credit: HST/ALMA projects 2109/2012.1.00978.S, P.I.: A. Karim) using three different filters (columns), color coded and treated aiming at displaying the faintest features of the object (rows). While the result looks appealing to the eye, it is not a fair representation of the system. It is instead the product of a wrong application of the method, reflecting the learning process of the PhD student. Quoting Alberto Giacometti: “The object of art is not to reproduce reality, but to create a reality of the same intensity.” Although in this case, creation came from an unrepeatable accident in an attempt of representing reality.
Author: Carlos Gómez Guijarro, PhD student (Dark Cosmology Centre, NBI). Studying the evolutionary link between primitive starburst and present-day massive galaxies.

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19 - Hard on the outside, Beautiful on the inside

by Jasmin Tordenro

This rock have toughened up over the years, but it is understandeble of what is has been through.
Meet Amphibolite, the rock who has undergone a metamorphose.
When he was young his friends called him Basalt and his mother was Miss Vulcano.
But after some few million years his friends started bullying him and pushed him down. He buried himself so far down that he had 30 km of blockage between him and the real world. He stayed there for a long, long time. Most other rocks would continue down in depression, but at 700 degrees and a pressur of 10 Kbars, Amphibolite had had enorgh. He fought himself up to the surface and when he could feel the sun on his minerals, he stopped. Happy that he had the courage to make himself happy. He learned a lot, being there, in the darkness. He was a changed stone, and that was noticeble.
Everytime the sun was shinning, his minerals sparkeled like diamonds. The lokals gave him the name Diamond Rock and you can find im in Sweden, where he will live out the rest of his days.
When i met him i was allowed to take my lup and look closer. And it is true. Beautiful he is with shiny Amphibol and big round red Granet minerals.
I am Jasmin Tordenro, af student of Geology and Geoscince at University of Copenhagen

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20 - To see a world in grain of sand

by Kim Nicole Dalby

The ocean floor and the moon have more in common than you think! They are both made of a rock called basalt. This image is a scanning electron microscope image of basalt from earth, which just happens to look like the moon. The whole image is only 100 micrometer across.

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21 - Precious bequer in flames

by Helena Augusta Lisboa de Oliveira

This is a beaker containing nanoparticles.

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22 - Only the Lonely Stork

by Carsten Wraae

Capturing wildlife can be tricky. Unless it's "still wildlife"... The picture is taken at 'Biologiska Museet' in Stockholm, a wonderful (if slightly dusty) place where dioramas of wildlife are only lit by natural light. The lasting moment caught here is of a 'ciconia ciconia' or 'white stork' standing proudly in its nest - maybe waiting for its mate?

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23 - Red eyed three frog

by Christina Toldbo

1. This frog is a red eyed three frog. As its name indicates it is an arboreal (ie. it spends a majority of its life in trees). The species is native to rainforests through Central America.
2. The picture was taken in the Arenal forest in Costa Rica. The scale is 1:1.
3. A normal iphone was used to take the image despite the rain and dim light in the forest at night.
4. The Latin name for the frog is Agalychnis callidryas which comes from the Greek words kalos (beautiful) and dryas (a tree or wood nymph).

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24 - Osmose

by Maja Rosenkilde og Mathilde Stoksted

På billedet ses et vandpestblad. Billedet er taget i forbindelse med et osmoseforsøg.

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25 - Algae

by Christina Molnar

This image depicts red algae with diatoms attached using darkfield microscopy at 400x magnification. A compound microscope and iPhone 6s were also used. The sample was collected from Alki beach, Washington. My passion of microscopy began during my undergraduate biology degree and I now pursue it as a hubby.

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26 - Cuddlefish in Sepia

by Dirk Müter

The picture is a false-colored scanning electron microscopy image (width is about 600 µm) of cuttlebone, i.e. the hard calcitic backbone found in cuttlefish. It is used by the cuttlefish to adjust buoyancy by pumping gas in and out of the space in between the ragged walls. In part of my research at the Nano-Science Center, I look into natural materials to find design strategies that can be adapted to improve man-made materials.

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27 - Hic Sunt Leones

by Giovanni Giuzio & Renato Sabato

Molybdenum disulfide structures on the edge of a silicon/silicon oxide substrate. Micrometers scale. SEM pictures taken while checking the morphology of MoS2 nanostructer during my Master Thesis project ""Morphology induced strain in MoS2 structures"". Apart from the classical mu-destert we are observing some wires, nanorods and very well hidden flakes of MoS2. This picture was really challenging since the author had to change the focus manually during the acquisition, in a challenge between man and auto-focus.
Growth of the sample and picture by Giovanni Giuzio, Master Student from Sapienza University of Rome, currently at AMOLF, Amsterdam. Picture taken in the AmsterdamNanocenter, with a FEI ""Verios"" SEM.
Coloring by Renato Sabato, graphic designer.
A proto-scientist passionate with art and a proto-artist passionate with science, first publication together.

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28 - The inside of a sandstone

by Jasmin Tordenro

What a rocks made of? Well 100% minerals. When you look at a thin section of a rock in a microscope you will see all the different kind of minerals. All mineral have special ""signatures"" like the one in right corner that have laminar strips. That is Plagioclase feldspar. Another eksample are the big ones that have different nuances of gray. These are the most common mineral: Quartz. But then, in this picture we see something even smaller, and that is Dissolved Calcite (Calcium) That are cementing the other minerals together, so we get a hard, stong stone. A Sandstone. These kind of stones are made in water from deposit of sand and sometimes clay and silt.
My name is Jasmin Vianne Tordenro and im studying Geology and Geoscience.

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29 - Kaleidoscopic Opalescence

by Alberto Viñas

This psychedelic pattern arose after freezing in liquid nitrogen a water/crude-oil emulsion. Both the colours and the pattern formed by dark precipitates form this unique fleeting image that is irreproducible.

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30 - NOLOGO

by Giovanni Giuzio

Molybdenum disulfide structures on the edge of a silicon/silicon oxide substrate. Micrometers scale. SEM pictures taken while checking the morphology of MoS2 nanostructer during my Master Thesis project ""Morphology induced strain in MoS2 structures.
The Bizarre structure that portraited is the outcome of Silicon Molybdenum Oxide and Molybdenum Disulfide after the attempt of obtaining MoS2 nanostructures via Atmospheric Chemical Vapour Deposition.
No explanation was found of this morphology, that occurred all over the sample. The body is covered with MoS2 "fluffy" nanoflakes. In the background 2D and few layer MoS2 triangles are visible.
Growth of the sample and picture by Giovanni Giuzio, Master Student from Sapienza University of Rome, currently at AMOLF, Amsterdam. Picture taken in the AmsterdamNanocenter, with a FEI "Verios" SEM.

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31 - The crow

by Riikka Arppe, Postdoctoral researcher

The picture shows a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image of hexagonal inorganic NaYF4 nanocrystals doped with Yb3+ and Er3+ ions. These nanocrystals exhibit unique photophysical property of photon upconversion, in which lower energy near-infrared excitation radiation is used to generate higher-energy emission at visible wavelengths. This is possible due to the metastable, ladder-like electronic energy levels of Er3+, to which excited Yb3+ ions transfer energy of two or more photons sequentially. TEM is an important tool in characterization of the size (here 30 nm) of upconverting nanophosphors (UCNP). Sometimes, after hours and hours of TEM-imaging in a dark room, staring at black dots on the screen, the imager (yours truly) starts to see shapes. In this image, the nanocrystals have clearly assembled to a shape of a mother crow and her baby. Picture was taken in Laboratory of Electron Microscopy, University of Turku, Finland, using JEM-1400+ TEM with 80 kV.

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32 - Finding hay in a needle stack

by Michael Asger Andersen

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a malignancy of the mature B-cells. It is the most common leukemia in the Western world, and there are an ever increasing number of new patients diagnosed in Denmark every year, with 550 patients diagnosed in 2015, compared to 300 patients in 2010. The heterogeneous disease course is a hallmark of CLL. The median survival can be under 3 years in high-risk patients and over 25 years in low-risk patients. Our group seeks to discover patterns predictive of the disease course.
The illustration shows the evolution of the lymphocytes over time for 4000 CLL patients. The x-axis is the number of years since diagnosis, and the y-axis is the lymphocyte count in a log10 scale. The yellow line shows the lymphocyte count for a single patient.

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33 - Cozy snowfall outside the window

by Fabrizio Gualandris

The image was taken with a secondary electron microscope while looking an electronic chip made by an almost tranparent membrane (bright part in the background). The two objects in front are two silicon holders and in the middle there is my thiny sample.

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34 - Moon landscape from a woodlouse

by Stine Eiersholt & Bjarke Salling

The cuticle of a woodlouse (Philosciidae) at micro-scale and imaged by SEM. The cuticle consist of different layers, responsible for making it rigid through calcium incorporation, and by providing a thin protective layer. Despite the protection of these layers the woodlouse still risk dehydration, and have thus adapted through the development of spikes and scales. The spikes are possibly used by the woodlouse to avoid dehydration by functioning as humidity sensing receptors. The extensiveness and depth of the scales indicate that they might work as a water storage or water conducting system, keeping the cuticle wet to avoid dehydration. When found in hot climate, the woodlouse can allow water to evaporate from the cuticle thereby keeping the temperature down.

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35 - The Michelin Man

by Adam Coln Hundahl & Nikolaj Korre Brinkenfeldt

"The Michelin Man" by Adam Coln Hundahl & Nikolaj Korre Brinkenfeldt - This dust particle was found among InAs nanowires during characterisation of a nanowire chip using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The particle it self is considered to be a contamination of the chip and serves no purpose for the nanowires. However, when enlarged the particle resembles the human form with a head and a body looking like the Michelin Man.
While this image is enlarged 20.000 times compared to what we humans can see, the SEM can enlarge objects up to 650.000 times allowing us to see down on the scale of nanometers (1 billionth of a meter).

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36 - Agony

by Fabrizio Gualandris

The image was taken using a transmission electron microscope looking to a ceramic sample. each doats is an atom! it represents the agony that each PhD student, at least time, ever felt in his/her job.

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37 - The Hoody Brothers

by Michael Lever

The Audience is looking at The Hoody Brothers. They were captured in Insulin cells (INS1e cells) using electron microscopy. The cells have been transfected with a construct that knocks-out the expression of a protein called PICK1- we wanted to look at gross architecture of subcellular structures like the endoplasmic reticulum and golgi when this protein is missing. There is a 5 micrometre scale bar on the images.

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38 - Flower pattern in a bacterial colony

by Liselotte Jauffred

In this study, we used pairs of isogenic E. coli strains expressing two different colors but similar fitness (Jauffred et al, ISME 2017). For the experiment, a mixture of the two strains was inoculated on an agar surface and the expanded colony was imaged with wide-field fluorescence microscopy, when about 1 cm large.
Even though this is a snapshot, it contains the entire evolution of the colony, where time progresses linearly along any radial vector. The center corresponds to the moment of inoculation of a well-mixed population and the rim of the colony to the strongly de-mixed era, when the snapshot is taken. Hence, we find a strong segregation of the two populations over time or, in other words, bacteria always end up in enclaves.

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39 - FURA loaded dopamine cells

by Camilla and Theis

1. FURA loaded dopamine cells
2. 40X
3. Calsium imaning
4. a part of Theis master project. look in to the diffence of brain activity in the ventral tagmental area in prenatale nicotine exposed mice
5. Theis Ipsen. master student at ILF. working for Kristi Ann Kohlmeier.

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40 - Eye of Sauron

by Fotis Mouselimis

Transmission spectrum of a CuCu2OCu device simulation

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41 - Progression of helical buckling of F-actin inside a filopodium

by Natascha Leijnse

Side view of the filamentous actin bundle inside a filopodium (blue) at four consecutive time points (50.4, 84.0, 100.8, 151.2 s) acquired with a confocal microscope.
Filopodia are membrane protrusions filled with filamentous actin which cells use to sense and explore their environment. They are highly dynamic structures, can exert piconewton forces on objects, and are key players during dynamic cellular processes such as motility and invasion.
We extended this filopodium from a living human HEK293 cell (red) using an optically trapped bead (not shown). The scale bar is 3 um. The actin bundle inside the filopodium rotates which leads to an accumulation torsional twist that consequently causes the filopodium to bend and shorten and thus 'pull', like a rubber band does when twisted with one hand while tightly held by the other one.
Our results provide the first clear evidence of rotation of the actin bundle within filopodia. This mechanism might facilitate both interaction and exploration of the cell's 3D environment.
I am a postdoc at Niels Bohr Institute in the Optical Tweezers group and the image is taken from our publication Leijnse, et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA (112) 2015.

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42 - Homemade digital microscope

by Stefan Lemser

This is a close-up of a 2dkk coin, a orange crayon-tip, tiny gold-star and a piece of ripped newspaper.
I was taken with a homemade microscope and a cellphone camera.
The real size of the objects is two millimeters
The microscope uses a lens from a laser-pointer as the focusing lens and a cellphone as a digital image capturing tool.
We are the students of L'école franco-danoise.
Dette er et nærbillede af en to-krone, en orange blyantspids, en lille guldstjerne og et stykke afrevet avispapir.
Det blev taget med et hjemmelavet mikroskop og et mobiltelefon-kamera.
Den rigtige størrelse af objekterne er to millimeter.
Mikroskopet bruger linsen fra en laserpind som fokuseringslinse og mobiltelefon-kameraet som digitalt billedetagnings-værktøj.
Vi er eleverne fra L'école franco-danoise.

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43 - Bacteria on fire

by Lina Hamouche

A swarming Bacillus subtilis community that advances in the form of dendrites as a cellular monolayer (up to 1.5cm – 2cm). This is a stereomicroscope photograph of a typical monolayered Bacillus subtilis dendritic swarm expressing GFP (ribosomal protein rpmGB-gfp fusion). This image was taken in order to show which cells in a swarm are actually growing and contributing to the overall biomass. Only the swarmer cells in yellow (high ribosomal protein expression) at the tips are pushing forward and multiplying, leaving a trail of quiescent daughter cells (orange/red) behind.
Lina Hamouche, phD, Laboratory of Microbial genetic expression, Institut de Biologie Physico-Chimique, CNRS UMR8261, Paris France.

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44 - Mosaic

by Tobias Tandrup

This is the processed and scaled diffraction pattern (h k l) (0 1 0) of a glycoside hydrolase family 51 enzyme, from Thermobacillus xylanilyticus. The atoms in an enzyme are spaced with only a few nanometers apart, and when synchrotron X-ray radiation is focused onto a protein crystal, a diffraction pattern such as this one is achieved. The pattern can be used to determine the 3D structure of a protein. Here, the diffraction spots have been colored according to intensity, giving the complex pattern a mosaic look.

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45 - MitWarhol

by Clara Prats

Human skeletal muscle mitochondrial network images with a single point laser scanning microscope. Using different Look Up Tables a composition inspired by Andy Warhol was made.

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46 - Nano toothbrush

by Fotis Mouselimis

It looks like a toothbrush, but it's actually a contour plot of a model for the contact resistance of the nickel-graphene interface.

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47 - Lace

by Andrii Lapytskyi

Fibroblast cells in artistic post-processing. Epi-fluorescent microscope Leica dm5500

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48 - Pretty woman

by Andrii Lapytskyi

Cells under the microscope

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49 - Dance

by Daniel Ruchayskiy

Fibroblast cells in artistic post-processing.
Epi-fluorescent microscope Leica dm5500.

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50 - Dance 2

by Daniel Ruchayskiy

Fibroblast cells in artistic post-processing.
Epi-fluorescent microscope Leica dm5500.

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51 - Fertility

by Jesper Rasmussen

The image shows a flooding on a field with a small "island" giving associations to an embryo. The images is one of hundreds from a series of drone images used for mapping soil fertility

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52 - Millions of years in a single portrait

by Jasmin Tordenro

10 Meters of sand layers from early Neogene time (23 million years ago). In each layer you can see clear current ripples that tells us what way the water was going. This is called Billund Formation and was made of sediment from the Norwegian and Swedish mountains. All the Sediment was transportet a long way by rivers and was deposited in a delta where Billund is now. That's why you only see kvartssand. All other minerals have been dissolved on the way. The more red/brown areas are iron compounds that have been in contact with air, so some periods have been more dry than others.
My name is Jasmin Vianne Tordenro, 27 years old and i am studying Geology and Geoscience at University of Copenhagen.

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53 - Rhopalium

by Sebastian-Alexander Stamatis

A rhopalium is a cubozoan sensory structure that contains 6 eyes and part of the cubozoan central nervous system. The cubozoans have four of these rhopalia, meaning they have 24 eyes and four small ""brains"". The fully grown rhopalium is around 3-400µm big.
To take this image, the rhopalium was first embedded in resin and sliced into 1µm thick segments. Then the segments were stained with Toluidine Blue, a dye that stains nucleic acids blue and polysaccharids purple. This makes it possible to differentiate between tissues in the sample. A light microscope was used at highest magnification (x100)to capture this image.
I took this image as part of my Master's thesis project which was about regeneration of the rhopalium. This image was used as a control and reference of what a fully developed rhopalium looks like. The image shows a longitudinal section through the middle of the rhopalium. Two of the eyes (left, blue colors), a crystalline weight (lower, white space) and a neuropil (a mass of nerves; right, greyish) can be seen in the image.
Sebastian-Alexander Stamatis, from the marine biology department, University of Copenhagen.

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54 - Whenever you touch me, My heart goes blind

by Srinivasan Sakthivel

Heart specific gene expression in 1 day-old Zebrafish embryo pair (Picture Scale-1.5mm). Whole mount in-situ hybridization is used to see the gene expression pattern under ZEISS bright-field light microscope.
Being one of the top control for the genes expressed in heart tissue, 'vmhc' gene shows its expression in heart and muscle chambers meaning a strong connection between skeletal muscles and heart. Top blue blurred region in this pair is heart and the picture itself is in the symbol of love, making the audience feel connected with (touching) muscle sense and love, meaning ‘Love does have some sense, and doesn’t matter how much crazy it goes’.
I am Srinivasan Sakthivel (SRI), a final year PhD student from Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

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55 - Imperfection

by Amalie Sigersen Kallenbach

Microscopy: Crystals formed from 1 ml 0.1 M Chinchonidine and 1 ml 0.3 M tartrate. The crystal have a fast rate of formation, causing the crystal to rapidly grow in all directions. That makes it no good for crystallographic structure determination as was the purpose of the task. With scientific eyes the crystal is imperfect.

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56 - Mushroom party

by Wonjong Kim

Hello, I am a PhD student in École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland. Here is the scanning electron microscope image of GaAs nanowire arrays on Silicon wafer. Recently, we have achieved high vertical yield GaAs nanowires using pre-defined pattern hole arrays. You can see very uniform and well-ordered nanowires looks like a mushroom :D. We deposited oxide layer on our nanowire arrays with PECVD (Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition) method to perform stress measurement along the nanowire. The scale bar on the image indicates 1 µm.

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57 - Ice crystals

by Helle Astrid Kjær

Ice crystals, cup shaped, 1 cm wide. Picture taken at the NEEM ice core drilling camp in Northwest Greenland during the melt event of 2012, where the entire surface of Greenland reached melt temperatures for a few days.
During the NEEM field campaign in 2012, the icecore camp was packed down and as a result the trenches were the ice core science take place were open to the surface. When the moist air causing the melt event 2012 went into the trenches which are approximate -25C they grow these large amazing crystals.

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58 - The Rebel

by Christina Greany Sørensen

A multi pipette working its way down a micro titter plate with a colorimetric glucose assay

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59 - Quasicrystal Simulation

by Mads Ohm Larsen

Testing the speed of our simulation framework, I made a quasicrystal animation. This image shows 5 plane waves with 37 stripes per wave animated over 30 iterations.
For at teste hastigheden på vores simuleringsframework, har jeg lavet en kvasikrystalsimulering. Billedet viser 5 flade bølger med 37 striper pr. bølge animeret over 30 iterationer.

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60 - The Crowns of Heat Transfer

by Tian Lei

Topology optimization (TO) is a promising technology for generating optimal designs numerically for many engineering applications and its territory extended to the field of convective heat transfer. For the first time, investment casting (IC) was developed to manufacture metal parts designed by 3D TO, with the assistance of stereolithography printing of castable resin. It is much cheaper than metal additive manufacturing (AM). Not like metal AM, it works for more kinds of alloys and it produces fully dense metals without porosity. With the armour of TO and the sword of IC, our heat sinks defeated the traditional ones with fins and became the Kings of the Heat Sink Kingdoms. Their 65 mm heat sink crowns are displayed and remained for people to wonder at. I am Tian Lei and we are collaborating researchers from the EFM section, DTU Energy and the TopOpt group, DTU Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark.

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61 - Shedding light into darkness

by Simon Bo Jensen

Liposomes are tiny bubbles of phospholipid molecules comprising only a few hundred nanometers in diameter. Here, multi-colored liposomes are imaged using TIRF microscopy — a technique allowing detection and visualization of single molecules near a surface. Cells, which are the fundamental building blocks of all living organisms, are confined by lipid membranes. Liposomes serve as artificial membrane models, and can be used to study many of the vital processes going on in living cells. Light is color, and color is light. By looking at molecules re-emitting light in the darkness, we are able study some of the smallest molecules of life, exploring the world at the nanoscale.
Simon Bo Jensen, Nano-Science Center, Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen.

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62 - Cool Destruction

by Kim Nicole Dalby

Scientists often use Liquid Nitrogen to keep scientific equipment nice and cold (-195.79 C cold to be precise). However all living tissue freezes and becomes solid when immersed in Liquid N. So flowers can be fractured with a hammer!

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63 - Focus Dude

by Kim Nicole Dalby

When the equipment you use to look at micrometer- sized samples is bigger than you! Here are some scientists at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. They are standing on a spectrometer that measures neutrons in solid material. In this case, the scientists wanted to measure very small amounts of water in chalk samples. You can read the results from this work here: https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.jpcc.7b01998

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64 - From little things, all things die?

by Kim Nicole Dalby

In the background of this photograph is Mt. Vesuvius, which stands 1281 meters above sea level. In 79AD the volcano violently erupted, covering the surrounding villages (including Pompeii) in meters of ash and minerals such as this one found near the crater in 2017.

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65 - Washed away

by Neil Vaytet

This montage is showing a sequence of 4 frames in an animation showing the Artis logo being washed away by fluid running from the top of the images towards the bottom. The animation was created with a software used by astrophysicists (the Morpheus code) to model gas flow in the interstellar medium (in astrophysics, gas and fluid are modeled in the same way).
Each pixel in the images contains fluid which has a density, velocity and pressure. The software then calculates how each cell interacts with its neighbours to propagate the moving fluid. The colours actually represent different densities in the fluid, and the logo was imprinted on the fluid by giving specific pixels a density 20 times higher than the surroundings. An incoming fluid then enters the image from the top and washes the logo away as it passes through. The multitude of vortices and instabilities generated by this simple set-up is fascinating as turbulence, a chaotic and unpredictable process, quickly sets in. The type of software used here tries to reproduce realistic fluid flows as closely as possible. Try to look for these vortices and other patterns next time you mix your milk into your cup of coffee or tea, you might be amazed what beauty lies right there!
My name is Neil Vaytet and I'm a Marie Curie postdoctoral fellow at the Centre for star and planet formation, Niels Bohr Institute. I use software like Morpheus to simulate the formation of newborn stars in the galaxy to try and explain the complicated sequence of events that enables cold interstellar gas to gravitationally condense and spawn new suns and their planetary systems like our own.
You can see a movie of the animation at this address: http://www.nbi.dk/~nvaytet/documents/artis_2017.mp4

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66 - The Crowns of Heat Transfer

by Tian Lei

Topology optimization (TO) is a promising technology for generating optimal designs numerically for many engineering applications and its territory extended to the field of convective heat transfer. For the first time, investment casting (IC) was developed to manufacture metal parts designed by 3D TO, with the assistance of stereolithography printing of castable resin. It is much cheaper than metal additive manufacturing (AM). Not like metal AM, it works for more kinds of alloys and it produces fully dense metals without porosity. With the armour of TO and the sword of IC, our heat sinks defeated the traditional ones with fins and became the Kings of the Heat Sink Kingdoms. One of the 65 mm heat sink crowns is displayed in heat experiment.

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67 - Space

by Daniel Ruchayskiy

Interior of a plant seen under the microscope

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68 - Flower

by Andrii Lapytskyi

Fluorescent flowers seen through the filters.

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69 - G.G.'s Bizarres Structures

by Giovanni Giuzio

MoS2/MoOx flowers on a SI/SiO2 substrate. Micrometers scale. SEM pictures taken while checking the morphology of MoS2 nanostructer during my Master Thesis project "Morphology induced strain in MoS2 structures".
This burst of spring is the outcome of Silicon Molybdenum Oxide and Molybdenum Disulfide after the attempt of obtaining MoS2 nanostructures via Atmospheric Chemical Vapour Deposition.
The structure is a composition of vertical Flakes/NAnoshit that rearranged assuming a morphology that remembers a flowerish fantasy.
The aim was to create structures to be used as catlyst in Hydrogen Evolution Reaction. Apart of mimicking the photosyntesis, this time we mimicked the flower shape.
Growth of the sample and picture by Giovanni Giuzio, Master Student from Sapienza University of Rome, currently at AMOLF, Amsterdam. Picture taken in the AmsterdamNanocenter, with a FEI "Verios" SEM.

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70 - LiFePO4

by Fotis Mouselimis

LiFePO4 (bulk) model for estimation of the Li-ion diffusion rates along different crystallographic directions.

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71 - MgO2LAg

by Fotis Mouselimis

MgO2LAg crystal (bulk) model for calculation of the work function change of a metallic Ag(100) surface as a consequence of depositing some layers of insulating MgO.

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72 - Homemade lava-lamps

by Stefan Lemser

These are homemade lava-lamps in tree glasses with oil, water, food coloring and an effervescent tablet.
It was taken with a regular camera.
The water will not mix with the oil since water is polar and oil is not. They separate in layers since oil has a lower density than water. When the effervescent tablet is put in it will sink through the non-polar oil and only react with the polar water. The reaction creates CO2 and will form bubbles carrying water to the top through the oil. When the bubble reaches the top, the gas escapes and the water will sink back down (You can use salt instead of the tablet).
We are the students of L'école franco-danoise.
Dette er hjemmelavede lava-lamper i tre glas med olie, vand, farvestof og en brusetablet.
Det er taget med et standardkamera.
Vandet vil ikke blandes med olien, da vand er polært, og olie ikke er. De skiller sig i to lag, da olie har en lavere massefylde end vand. Når brusetabletten puttes i, vil den synke igennem den ikke-polære olie og først reagere med det polære vand. Reaktionen skaber CO2 og vil danne bobler, der bærer vandet til toppen gennem olien. Når boblen når toppen, vil gassen undslippe, og vandet vil synke ned igen (Man kan bruge salt i stedet for olie).
Vi er eleverne fra L'école franco-danoise.

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73 - Green Fluorescent Giraffe

by Stefan Lemser

These are small cells with Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) in their cell structure. We used the picture editing program GIMP to draw the giraffe.
The picture was taken with a fluorescent microscope.
The cells have a diameter of about 10 micrometer.
Normally it’s hard to see the cell structure, even with a microscope, but with the GFP it is now is a possibility. The GFP lights up when a particular range of light frequency is shining upon it. GFP originally is found in the jellyfish “Aequorea Victoria” and is now being used to study the interaction between proteins and microorganisms amongst others. Proteins normally can’t be seen by regular microscopes since they are too small but the GFP acts like a little beacon of light which allows us to identify the protein.
We are the students of L'école franco-danoise.

Dette er små celler med Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) i deres cellestruktur. Vi brugte billedbehandlingsprogrammet GIMP til at tegne giraffen.
Billedet er taget med et fluorescens mikroskop.
Cellerne er omkring 10 mikrometer i diameter.
Normalt er det svært at se cellens struktur, selv med et mikroskop, men med GFP kan det nu lade sig gøre. GFP’et lyser op, når et særligt interval af lysfrekvens lyser på det. GFP fandt man oprindeligt i vandmanden “Aequorea Victoria” og det bliver nu brugt til bl.a. at studere interaktionen mellem proteiner og mikroorganismer. Proteiner kan man normalt ikke se med et mikroskop, (da de er for små,) men GFP virker som et lille fyrtårn, der tillader os at identificere proteinet.
Vi er eleverne fra L'école franco-danoise."

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74 - Spawn of K'thulu

by Stefan Lemser

This is a picture of a fungus.
The picture was taken with a digital camera
The petri dish is 6 cm in diameter
There are fungal spores and bacteria everywhere; normally they don’t grow that much since they compete with other organisms. In our body we also have a pretty nifty defense system called the immune system which keeps pathogens away. In this case we took a small amount of dirt, put it in a petri dish with some food for microorganism and gave it just the right amount of heat and time to grow. After the incubation period we now see a fungus with small tentacle-like strands which has taken over the dish. Microorganisms was first discovered in the period 1665-1683 by using a simple microscope, but not until after 150 years was the discovery used to explain and treat infectious diseases.
Vi er eleverne fra L'école franco-danoise.

Dette er et billede af en svamp.
Billedet blev taget med et digitalt kamera
Petriskålen er 6 cm i diameter
Der er svampesporer og bakterier overalt; normalt gror de ikke så meget, da de konkurrerer med andre organismer. I kroppen har vi også en ret smart forsvarsmekanisme, immunsystemet, som holder fremmede-organismer væk. I dette tilfælde tog vi en smule jord, lage det i en petriskål med lidt mad til mikroorganismerne, og så gav vi det den rette mængde varm og tid til at gro. Efter inkubationsperioden ser vi nu en svamp med små tentakelagtige strenge, som har overtaget petriskålen. Mikroorganismer blev først opdaget i perioden 1665-1683 ved brug af et simpelt mikroskop, men først efter 150 år blev opdagelsen brugt til at forklare og behandle infektionssygdomme.
Vi er eleverne fra L'école franco-danoise.

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75 - Anatomy of a tumor suppressor

by Matteo Lambrughi

I'm Matteo Lambrughi, postdoc at the Computational Biology Laboratory, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen. We are using cutting-edge computational methods to investigate the structural biology of biomolecules involved in cancer paving the way for counteracting the damaging effects of mutations and design new anticancer therapies. One of our major target is the tumor suppressor protein p53, on which we are collecting molecular simulations investigating the functional effects of tumor-promoting mutations. The picture is a rendering of the X-ray structure of p53 DNA Binding Domain (white) in complex with the DNA (green) (PDB 1TSR). We are using the Pyintheraph software on molecular simulations to study the networks of intramolecular contacts between the residues of the protein, represented as blue sticks. The spheres indicate the residues involved in multiple contacts using shade of color from yellow (2 contacts) to red (more then 8 contacts). The figure was prepared using Pymol.

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76 - Organ development on a computer

by Silas Boye Nissen

Cells in the human body self-organize during embryonic development into many different organs consisting of folded sheets and surfaces. An important aspect of organ formation is cell polarity where cells align their polarity with neighboring cells.
Here, we modelled the development of 8000 polar cells based on one equation. All cells are initialized in a clump with random polarity. The cells develop into a final structure which in the illustration has been cut in half to make the inner channels and surfaces visible.
Blue-white indicates the negative polarity side of the cells while red-yellow indicates the positive side. The more blue/red the cell is, the closer it is to the viewer.
My name is Silas Boye Nissen, and I am a PhD student at the Center for Stem Cell Decision Making (StemPhys) at the Niels Bohr Institute.

Celler i den menneskelige krop danner under fosterudviklingen på egen hånd adskillige organer som består af foldede planer og overflader. Et vigtigt aspekt af organdannelsen er cellepolaritet hvor cellerne justerer deres polaritet ift. deres naboers polaritet og position.
Her modellerer vi udviklingen af 8000 polære celler vha. en enkel ligning. Alle celler starter i en kompakt klump med hver sin tilfældige polaritet. Cellerne udvikler sig til en endelig struktur som i illustrationen er blevet skåret halvt over hvorefter de indre kanaler og overflader kommer til syne.
Blåt-hvidt indikerer cellernes negative polaritetsside mens rødt-gult indikerer deres positive side. Desto mere blåt/rødt cellen er, desto tættere er den på beskueren.
Mit navn er Silas Boye Nissen, og jeg er PhD-studerende ved Center for Stamcelledynamik (StemPhys) på Niels Bohr Institutet.

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77 - The Cobra

by Silas Boye Nissen

Many multicellular organisms develop from one single cell into one big organism with head and tail in opposite directions. How this direction is determined is an interesting research question.
An important aspect of how organisms on a macroscale get their head and tail correctly positioned is that on a microscale many cells already have an inherent direction.
Here, we modelled the development of 1000 polar cells based on one equation. The cells started on a flat plane with polarity pointing upwards with the expectation that they would stay on a plane forever. Unexpectedly, a few hours emerged this cobra shape. The polarized cells had formed a head and a tail in opposite directions!
My name is Silas Boye Nissen, and I am a PhD student at the Center for Stem Cell Decision Making (StemPhys) at the Niels Bohr Institute.

Mange flercellede organismer udvikler sig på fascinerende vis fra én enkelt celle til én stor organisme med hoved og hale i hver sin retning. Hvordan retningen afgøres er et interessant forskningsspøgsmål.
Et vigtigt aspekt af hvordan organismer på makroskala får hovedet og halen placeret korrekt er at allerede på mikroskala har mange celler en indbygget retning.
En dag modellede vi udviklingen af 1000 polære celler vha. en enkel ligning. Cellerne startede i et fladt plan med polaritet opad med en forventning om at de ville forblive et fladt plan for altid. Et par timer senere voksede der til vores store overraskelse denne kobraslange frem på skærmen. De polariserede celler havde dannet hoved og hale i modsat retning!
Mit navn er Silas Boye Nissen, og jeg er PhD-studerende ved Center for Stamcelledynamik (StemPhys) på Niels Bohr Institutet.

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