Artis 2018 Entries – University of Copenhagen

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Artis 2018 Entries

The entries for the ARTiS Contest 2017.


V1 - F1

by Catherine Ward

My name is Catherine Ward, a Fine Arts degree student studying at Solent University, Southampton. For my Third Year Fine Arts degree work I examine and explore the biological side of my identity. Aware of the fact that we symbiotically share our bodies with millions of micro-organisms, I wanted to find a way to visually appreciate the microscopic self in a macroscopic format. I started out by taking swabs from my own body and inoculating them on nutrient agar, the tricky aspect being that I was doing all this outside of a lab setting; in my home with a home-made incubator and self-made agar solution. This made the experience even more intimate, as whilst the environment may not be as clinical and sterile as would be ideal, any environmental microbes that infect the samples would at least be the same ones that I am exposed to and live with every day. As the project developed, I discovered a way of digitally drawing over images of the petri dishes to create a series of impactful and aesthetically impressive pop-art style works. The seemingly-random formation of the bacterial and fungal cultures are chaotic yet structured; forms and shapes influenced by the growth rings of individual colonies, and by the interaction between competing species. In time I came to realise that this series of drawings is an in-depth and intimate self-portrait; of me and about me, but with very little influence by my conscious creative input. The deepest extent of my physical contribution was in the inoculation of the plates themselves, and the choice of background colour on the finished drawing: the colour of the colonies in the drawings are directly dictated by the colour of the actual sample. The titles of each piece relates to the chart I used to record where each swab sample had been taken from, rather than explicitly say that in the title and risk influencing the viewers predisposed experience of work. I found these works exciting and empowering, enabling me to produce a unique and powerful self-portrait which I would have never otherwise even realised existed. The series of works will be shown in my Fine Arts graduating degree show at Solent University, Southampton in June 2018.

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V2 - C43

by Catherine Ward

My name is Catherine Ward, a Fine Art degree student studying at Solent University, Southampton. For my Third Year Fine Art degree work I have been examining and exploring the biological side of my identity. Aware of the fact that we symbiotically share our bodies with millions of micro-organisms, I wanted to find a way to be able to visually appreciate the microscopic self in a macroscopic format. I started out by taking swabs from my own body an inoculating them on nutrient agar, the tricky aspect being that I was doing all this outside of a lab setting; in my home with a home-made incubator and self-made agar solution. This made the experience even more intimate, as whilst the environment may not be as clinical and sterile as would be ideal, any environmental microbes that infect the samples would at least be the same ones that I am exposed to and live with every day. As the project developed, I discovered a way of digitally drawing over images of the petri dishes to create a series of impactful and aesthetically impressive pop-art style works. The seemingly-random formation of the bacterial and fungal cultures are chaotic yet structured; forms and shapes influenced by the growth rings of individual colonies, and by the interaction between competing species. In time I came to realise that this series of drawings is an in-depth and intimate self-portrait; of me and about me, but with very little influence by my conscious creative input. The deepest extent of my physical contribution was in the inoculation of the plates themselves, and the choice of background colour on the finished drawing: the colour of the colonies in the drawings are directly dictated by the colour of the actual sample. The titles of each piece relates to the chart I used to record where each swab sample had been taken from, rather than explicitly say that in the title and risk influencing the viewers predisposed experience of work. I found these works exciting and empowering, enabling me to produce a unique and powerful self-portrait which I would have never otherwise even realised existed. The series of works will be shown in my Fine Art graduating degree show at Solent University, Southampton in June 2018.

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V3 - B4

by Catherine Ward

My name is Catherine Ward, a Fine Art degree student studying at Solent University, Southampton. For my Third Year Fine Art degree work I have been examining and exploring the biological side of my identity. Aware of the fact that we symbiotically share our bodies with millions of micro-organisms, I wanted to find a way to be able to visually appreciate the microscopic self in a macroscopic format. I started out by taking swabs from my own body an inoculating them on nutrient agar, the tricky aspect being that I was doing all this outside of a lab setting; in my home with a home-made incubator and self-made agar solution. This made the experience even more intimate, as whilst the environment may not be as clinical and sterile as would be ideal, any environmental microbes that infect the samples would at least be the same ones that I am exposed to and live with every day. As the project developed, I discovered a way of digitally drawing over images of the petri dishes to create a series of impactful and aesthetically impressive pop-art style works. The seemingly-random formation of the bacterial and fungal cultures are chaotic yet structured; forms and shapes influenced by the growth rings of individual colonies, and by the interaction between competing species. In time I came to realise that this series of drawings is an in-depth and intimate self-portrait; of me and about me, but with very little influence by my conscious creative input. The deepest extent of my physical contribution was in the inoculation of the plates themselves, and the choice of background colour on the finished drawing: the colour of the colonies in the drawings are directly dictated by the colour of the actual sample. The titles of each piece relates to the chart I used to record where each swab sample had been taken from, rather than explicitly say that in the title and risk influencing the viewers predisposed experience of work. I found these works exciting and empowering, enabling me to produce a unique and powerful self-portrait which I would have never otherwise even realised existed. The series of works will be shown in my Fine Art graduating degree show at Solent University, Southampton in June 2018.

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V4 - Paving the way for personalized medicine

by Alexander Hauser

There is extensive genetic variation among the human population in the amino acid sequence of a drug receptor protein (shades of grey). Some variants may lead to altered drug response or adverse reactions (red). Genetic variations change a person's response to medicine (indicated by the drug binding to the coloured receptor positions and individuals), including how well it works and whether it hurts the person. Through the utilization of recent advances in large-scale genomic sequencing, it is hoped that pharmaceutical drug treatments can be optimized for narrow subsets of patients or even for each individual's unique genetic makeup. The potential implications are tremendous: It can be used to explain a patient's lack of treatment, lead to minimizations of the occurrence of drug toxicities, adverse drug reactions and to suggest alternative therapies that would best suit a persons requirements. In our research, we are attempting to better characterize these variations to ultimately increase prescription precision, improve patients' quality of life, and relieve the economic and societal burden due to variable drug responsiveness.

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V5 - A bird's eye view on data

by Alexander Hauser

Data visualisation is an important tool to understand and communicate one's research. This is an artistic transformation of receptor RNA expression levels (yellow bars) from all human membrane receptors (GPCRs) in human kidney cell lines (HEK293). The circular orientation gives it an iris-like look representing a "deep eye's" view into the data. The first glance can be misleading and often it is required to study extensively for the meaningful pieces of information in a given dataset or experiment. This visualisation was used to look for potential off-target drug effects from other highly expressed receptors. The visualisation was created using Circos and Illustrator. Alexander Hauser, PhD Fellow and data scientist at the Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen.

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V6 - Mimicking Nature at Lund NanoLab

by Laura Abariute

With the naked eye, a butterfly (Vanessa cardui, left column images) and a semiconductor wafer employed at a Lund NanoLab (right column images) have nothing in common, but by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) we can uncover hidden structures, which are similar and mimik one another. The butterfly was a kind donation by the Museum of Innovation and Science (Schenectady, NY, USA) and was imaged at SUNY Polytechnic Institute (Albany, NY, USA). The images on the right column (from the top to the bottom) are silicon wafer; GaP nanowires used in Nanosafety research; InP nanowires and their pattern used in solar cell research development. SEM images are artificially colored using Photoshop, all images were taken by me.

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V7 - How to make the curved linear

by Christian Frankær

The calibration function y(x) and its derivatives of an optical chemical sensor containing two responsive dyes. The contributions from each dye to the over all sensor performance is characterized by S-shaped Bjerrum curves. For an optical sensor containing two dyes, the resulting calibration curve is the sum of the S-shaped curves of individual dyes. The plot shows that perfect linearity can be obtained when three inflection points reduces to one, and thereby that optical chemical sensors with broad sensitivity ranges and simple calibration procedures are obtainable. Author: Christian Frankær, Postdoc (Department of Chemistry, Nano-Science Center), developing optical pH sensors based on fluorescent molecules.

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V8 - Non-linear millipede

by Behbood Abedi ft. Bruno Fonseca

This is the Hele-Shaw flow between two parallel flat plates separated by an infinitesimally small gap. Various problems in fluid mechanics can be approximated to these flows; so the study of them is of great importance. A fluid is injected into the shallow geometry from below where it is bounded by another liquid or gas. In this case: when a newtonian fluid with variable injection rate penetrates a viscoplastic material, we get the non-linear millipede, simple!

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V9 - Snowflake

by Behbood Abedi ft. Bruno Fonseca

This is the Hele-Shaw flow between two parallel flat plates separated by an infinitesimally small gap. A fluid is injected into the shallow geometry from below where it is bounded by another liquid or gas. Various problems in fluid mechanics can be approximated to these flows; so the study of them is of great importance. In this case: air penetrates a viscous polymer with high injection rate, so the viscous fingering generates this gorgeous snowflake.

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V10 - A peaceful eye

by Behbood Abedi ft. Bruno Fonseca

This is the Hele-Shaw flow between two parallel flat plates separated by an infinitesimally small gap. A fluid is injected into the shallow geometry from below where it is bounded by another liquid or gas. Various problems in fluid mechanics can be approximated to these flows; so the study of them is of great importance. In this case: When a less viscous fluid is displaced with a more viscous fluid at low injection rate, there is a stable front and everything is at peace!

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V11 - Lonely tree

by Behbood Abedi ft. Bruno Fonseca

This is the Hele-Shaw flow between two parallel flat plates separated by an infinitesimally small gap. A fluid is injected into the shallow geometry from below where it is bounded by another liquid or gas. Various problems in fluid mechanics can be approximated to these flows; so the study of them is of great importance. In this case: Air was injected to push a polymer, the viscosity ratio was high, so breakthrough happened fast. Air was not right to sweep the polymer, he chose to flow through the tree veins.

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V12 - Dancing dandelion

by

This is the Hele-Shaw flow as between two parallel flat plates separated by an infinitesimally small gap. A fluid is injected into the shallow geometry from below when it is bounded by another liquid or gas. Various problems in fluid mechanics can be approximated to these flows; so the study of them is of great importance. In this case: The viscosity ratio between Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid, the injection rate, the surface tension and etc., all were in our behest to create this lovely dancing dandelion.

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NANO1 - The inner workings of a painkiller

by Alexander Hauser

The picture is a rendering of the X-ray structure of the mu opioid receptor. The receptor is widely distributed in the brain and is the primary site of action for the most commonly used opioids including morphine, cocaine and heroin. Opioid receptors are members of the superfamily of 7-transmembrane spanning proteins, which is represented by the spiral-staircase like helices. When a painkiller binds the opioid receptor embedded in the cell membrane, then the receptor performs a complex inner rearrangement leading to a signal communication to other proteins. This signal leads to a reduction of neurotransmitters vital in the transmission of pain - hence opioid receptor activation creates a strong analgesic (relief from pain) effect. This complex intra-molecular signalling is represented by residue-residue contacts of the protein (shown in green). Atomic representations of proteins help understanding the molecular functions of our drugs and provide means to improve todays medicine by reducing adverse reactions.

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NANO2 - Wrapped in fat

by Alexander Hauser

For many years, people realized that cells had to be able to signal information to each other in some way. But how? There had to be some kind of entity that would transmit the signal from the outside of the cell membrane barrier somewhow to set off a response inside the cell. These entities are receptors (grey) like G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) embedded in the fatty cell membrane or lipid bilayer (pink). We are studying GPCRs through molecular simulations in order to understand the human hormone signalling system and to leverage their accessibility through targeted drug design. The image is a rendered atomic representation of the cannabinoid receptor obtained by X-ray crystallography and designed in PyMol. Alexander Hauser, PhD Fellow at the Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen.

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NANO3 - Nano vineyard

by Wonjong Kim

Hello, my name is Wonjong Kim. I am a second year PhD student in EPFL, Switzerland. Currently, I am working on nanowire array based solar cells. Here is an SEM image of GaAs nanowires on a silicon wafer. You can see nanoscale grapes cultivated in the clean room facilities. Very uniform and well-ordered nanowires are touching each other and made a beautiful network after a reactive ion etching process.

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NANO4 - Human Adenovirus D26

by Dr. Victor Padilla-Sanchez, PhD

Human Adenovirus D26 is the cause of conjunctivitis and very important in vaccine development to treat different diseases like cancer. We are looking at the atomic level resolution structure of Human Adenovirus D26. Adenoviruses are around 100 nm in size. This molecular model has been constructed based on the X-rays structures of the pentons, hexons and spikes of the virus fed into the UCSF Chimera Visualization Software using the cryoEM reconstruction of the full virus as a template to fit the viral components. Adenoviruses are important for vaccine development and its study will lead to treatments for different diseases like conjunctivitis as is the case of strain D26. My name is Victor Padilla-Sanchez, PhD. I am a biological researcher at Washington Metropolitan University. I have been studying viruses for more than a decade.

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NANO5 - Fish?

by Dr Jonathan Quinson

You can observe carbon nanotubes. Each individual nanotube is about 100 nm in diameter. The technique used to grow them lead to a 'forest'. Here it comes up with the form of a fish head trying to swallow something. I added the red eyes. Otherwise the image was taken using scanning electron microscopy (at the University of Oxford, UK). Carbon nanotubes are heavily considered for applications in catalysis, energy, chemical production, aerospace due to their outstanding mechanical, electrical or chemical properties. I am a post-doc at the University of Copenhagen and did my PhD on carbon material synthesis and characterisation.

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NANO6 - Moon?

by Dr Jonathan Quinson

When working with nanomaterials sometimes strange features appear. Here you can see iron nanoparticles deposited on a silicon substrate. They are less than 100 nm and can be used as a catalyst to grow carbon nanotubes. From this top view taken with a scanning electron microscope it seems that we unreveal the surface a strange planet. I used powerpoint to add the image of an astronaut to make it look like we found a new land/moon. I am a post-doc at the University of Copenhagen, previously doing my PhD at the University of Oxford where this image was taken in the context of research on growth of carbon nanotubes.

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NANO7 - Rabbit Hole?

by Dr Jonathan Quinson

You can see here a 'Forest' made of carbon nanotubes (the vertical line). Each carbon nanotubes is ca. 100 nm in diameter (a bit like the diameter of your hair). I took this image with a scanning electron microscope. The 'hole' we observe come from a hole I made using a laser. I was doing so to characterise the carbon structure of the nanotubes but I focused it too much and the temperature went so high (more than 500 degree C) on this small spot that it burned the nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are heavily studied for electronics and increasingly considered to be used in portable devices like 'intelligent' clothes. I took this image during my PhD at the University of Oxford and I am now a post-doc at the University of Copenhagen.

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NANO8 - Spaghetti?

by Dr Jonathan Quinson

You are looking at carbon nanotubes. The diameter of each tubes (the 'filaments' in the image) is about 100 nm. The image was taken using a scanning electron microscope at the University of Oxford during my PhD on carbon nanotube synthesis and characterisation. Carbon nanotubes are studied to improve various devices in the fields of energy, medical science, sensors, electronics, aerospace. I am now a post-doc at the University of Copenhagen working on the synthesis of other very fun materials: nanoparticles.

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NANO9 - Straws?

by Dr Jonathan Quinson

Believe it or not you are looking at nanotubes. Their diameter is about 100 nm and you can see that they are hollow inside in this scanning electron microscope image. You may notice that some are blocked: these are iron nanoparticles used to catalyse their formation. The controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes is really important for many applications: electronics, aerospace, energy, filters, sensors, catalysis and many more. The image was taken during my PhD at the University of Oxford. I am now a post-doc at the University of Copenhagen.

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NANO10 - Needle in a haystack

by Mikkel Herzberg

It is an AFM image of amyloid-beta fibrils lying on a surface. The image was obtained as a part of my master's thesis, where I investigated the molecular mechanisms behind Alzheimer's disease. My name is Mikkel and I am a master student in Nanoscience.

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MICRO1 - The Cytoskeleton and Cell Migration

by Alwin Kamermans

Cultured mouse tumor cells. These tumor cells, originating from a neuroblastoma, have been in culture since 1971. The cells have been stained using phalloidin, a toxin that binds to the cytoskeleton of the cell. In the laboratory, a fluorescent substance is bound to this toxin, allowing the cytoskeleton to be visualized. These neuroblastoma cells are known to be highly motile, where reorganization of the cytoskeleton is an important process during cell migration. This image is made using a confocal microscope, the colors represent z-axis, blue is closest to viewer, while yellow/orange is furthest away.

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MICRO2 - I give my heart to science

by Canan Doganli

I am a postdoc at University of Copenhagen. We are interested in investigating how a normal heart develops and what leads to structural malformations in the heart during its development. These malformations are known as congenital heart defects (CHD), and are the most common birth defects. In order to shed light on causes of CHD, we use zebrafish as a model system. Zebrafish is an attractive model to study heart development due to embryo transparency and rapid development, and importantly unlike avian and mammalian embryos, which die rapidly in the absence of a functional cardiovascular system, zebrafish embryos are not completely dependent on a functional cardiovascular system for their early development. This allows the analysis of live embryos with severe cardiovascular defects. Here is a scanning electron microscopy image of a 5 day old zebrafish heart, red, in the micrometer scale . I took the image in my previous institution UCSF.

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MICRO3 - Overetched lead

by Dags Olsteins

Here we see an optical microscope darkfield image of a severely over-etched lead film that has been exposed to buffered hydrofluoric acid. This is the first attempt at making an etching recipe for lead. The rectangles are holes in the polymer resist with a width of 0.5 to 5 micrometers. The blue crystalline structures show the actual holes etched in the lead. The exposure time has been too large and the holes in the lead have grown much larger than the bounds of the desired pattern. No artificial colors.

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MICRO4 - The Adventure of 'Calagon'

by Cheng Choo Lee

We are looking at cryo-FESEM image of a mineral comprised of calcite (particle agglomerate) and aragonite (rod-like shape). Interestingly, the captured image also showed a pair of creatures (a stone-aged man with his piggy pet) on the 'mineral' that looks like a 'skeleton-skull'. The image was taken and colorized by Cheng Choo Lee (Umeå Core Facility for Electron Microscopy, UmU) and the sample was courtesy of Elin Tollefsen (Geological Sciences, SU).

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MICRO5 - Enlightenment

by Olga Sosnovtseva and Alexey Brazhe

Astrocytes — most abundant non-neuronal cells of the brain — are faithful partners of neurons. But recent studies show that they have an agenda of their own, which we can read out by looking at their calcium signals. Many believe that the key to decipher astrocytic activity is in interplay between their morphology and cellular mechanisms. We tackle them with the state-of-the-art image analysis algorithms and models using parallel GPU-based computing technology NVIDIA CUDA.

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MICRO6 - Entering a cancer cell

by Ditlev Birch

This image shows the uptake of a peptide into breast cancer cells. The peptide (green) is taken by the endosomal network (bright spots) and some may escape to the cytosol (faint background). The plasma membrane (red) and nucleus (blue) is notably left untouched by the drug.

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MICRO7 - Smiley

by Ditlev Birch

This image shows the distribution of a drug in a cervical cancer cell. The localization in the nucleoli (red dot) makes for a familiar, happy resemblance.

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MICRO8 - I dropped my balls

by Carla Little

My name is Carla Colque, I am a PhD student originally from Bolivia. I research plant breeding with emphasis in plant pathogens at KU-crop science Tåstrup. This is Peronospora variabilis, It is a fungi that causes disease in the leaves of quinoa. Yes its host is a trendy crop nowadays. Its grain has a very high content of protein, amino acids and it is been taken to International Space stations! Since it is able to enter the seed and rest inside, it can get a ride to outer space too. However, it needs to be in its sexual stage for this and here it is looking for a mating type and gee… it is getting impatient! By the way it is completely harmless to humans. You cannot see it in display like this unless you place it under the 40x magnification of a microscope.

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MICRO9 - Neuro–sperm in the brainstem

by Cesar Ramon Romero Leguizamon

During the development of the project “Stress Hormone effects on drug addiction-related neurons: implications for drug use during periods of stress and the etiology of depression”, immunohistochemical characterization of cholinergic neurons of the Laterodorsal Tegmental area was performed, in the brainstem of the mice in a cerebral brain slice (40 μm thick), using Anti-Nitric Oxide Synthase Brain antibody. The stain signal was obtained using a GFP filter-cube set in the microscope (Axioskop 2, Zeiss) fitted with a monochrome CCD digital camera (Axiocam MRM, Zeiss, Germany), (Wavelength 460 nm). Images were collected using Axiovision 4,6 (Zeiss) software. See in the right half of the image (20X / 50 µm) a group of these neurons surrounding the dorsal tegmentum, in the same way that sperm surrounds an egg during the process of fertilization. This pattern of distribution is so unique and unusual is that it was decided to call this group of cells “Neuro-sperm.”

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MICRO10 - Micro Moon

by Katarzyna Tumidajewicz

This photo is not what it seems: the image depicts breast cancer cells ready for counting, in the middle of ongoing research. Each cell is around 20 micrometers wide. The image was taken with a smartphone, with the camera pointed into the lens of the microscope. Photo taken by Katarzyna Tumidajewicz, a Computer Science student at University of Copenhagen. Courtesy of Maria Postol, who is writing her thesis at the research at Danish Cancer Society Research Center, studies Biotechnology at University of Copenhagen and who kindly allowed for this insight into this micro-cosmos of fascinating research.

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MICRO11 - Training for World Cup 2018

by Laura Abariute

Not only football players train for their important games! Believe it or not, but human cells do the same. In this video human lung defense players (cells, aka macrophages) are training for immune system attacks. Macrophages play with footballs (dead cells), by kicking and pushing them around until they are destroyed which is the goal! Then the game is won and OVER for the dead cells!

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MICRO12 - The heart of brown adipose tissue

by Kathrine Lundø Larsen

The motif of a blood clot in H&E-stained brown adipose tissue from diet-induced obese mice treated with nicotine. The picture is a part of a large study about the role of acetylcholine in appetite regulation and food-reward from the Clemmensen Group, CBMR. The picture was taken using light microscopy and is 10x magnified. I am a research assistant from Christoffer Clemmensens group at CBMR, Section for Metabolic Receptology.

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MICRO13 - Mini-Bang?

by Dr Jonathan Quinson

In this picture taken by scanning electron microscopy you can see a strange arrangement of carbon nanotubes. Individual carbon nanotubes are ca. 100 nm in diameter and tend to entangle due to various interaction between them. in this specific case it seems like an explosion occurred, like a Big-Bang, but at a very small scale (the overall image is smaller than 1 mm x 1 mm). Carbon nanotubes are heavily studied for various applications like aerospace especially due to their outstanding mechanical properties. I am a post-doc at the University of Copenhagen where I also did my PhD on carbon nanomaterials synthesis and characterisation.

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MICRO14 - Ocean On a Bed of Needles

by Louise August Nielsen and Rasmus Dalsgaard Schlosser

What you are seeing is the result of living human cells that have established a tight fit to a forest of nanoscale needle-like structures called nanowires. These nanowires, being ~4 μm tall and having a diameter of 100 nanometers, can amplify light signals. We use these in combination with laser scanning confocal microscopy, to investigate the interactions between fluorescent proteins within the living cell. A thin wafer-like chip, having an area of barely 1 cm2, is densely populated with these nano-structures. The chip is manipulated by pinchers, meaning that experimental success is somewhat dependent on the dexterity of the researcher. Dropping the chip face down into a microscope chamber resulted in this strange, wavelike landscape, of smeared cells and chipped nanowires. A fluorescent dye solution was added to produce the light intensities seen in this image. The image is pseudo coloured, as confocal laser scanning microscopy produces only grayscale images.

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MICRO15 - Life

by Andrea E. Toth

Look at the picture! What do you see? What do you feel? I don`t need to tell you what it was originally… I was spending long lonely days in a dark room letting my high-content screening microscope collect data about vesicular structures in brain endothelial cells labelled by immunocytochemistry. These images will give tonnes of valuable data to analyse. Sometimes, the images are out of focus or just some air bubbles found its way to hide and cheat science with the beauty of light interference. These images are artefacts. I should delete them; they are no value for science. Or… wait! Have they really no value at all? They are beautiful… Andrea E. Toth, Aarhus University.

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MICRO16 - Modern

by Andrea E. Toth

Look at the picture! What do you see? What do you feel? I don`t need to tell you what it was originally… I was spending long lonely days in a dark room letting my high-content screening microscope to collect data about vesicular structures in brain endothelial cells labelled by immunocytochemistry. These images will give tons of valuable data to analyse. Sometimes, the images are out of focus or just some air bubbles found its way to hide and cheat science with the beauty of light interference. These images are artefacts. I should delete them; they are no value for science. Or… wait! Have they really no value at all? They are beautiful… Andrea E. Toth, Aarhus University

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MICRO17 - Out of blue

by Andrea E. Toth

Look at the picture! What do you see? What do you feel? I don`t need to tell you what it was originally… I was spending long lonely days in a dark room letting my high-content screening microscope to collect data about vesicular structures in brain endothelial cells labelled by immunocytochemistry. These images will give tons of valuable data to analyse. Sometimes, the images are out of focus or just some air bubbles found its way to hide and cheat science with the beauty of light interference. These images are artefacts. I should delete them; they are no value for science. Or… wait! Have they really no value at all? They are beautiful… Andrea E. Toth, Aarhus University.

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MICRO18 - Tulip

by Andrea E. Toth

Look at the picture! What do you see? What do you feel? I don`t need to tell you what it was originally… I was spending long lonely days in a dark room letting my high-content screening microscope to collect data about vesicular structures in brain endothelial cells labelled by immunocytochemistry. These images will give tons of valuable data to analyse. Sometimes, the images are out of focus or just some air bubbles found its way to hide and cheat science with the beauty of light interference. These images are artefacts. I should delete them; they are no value for science. Or… wait! Have they really no value at all? They are beautiful… Andrea E. Toth, Aarhus University.

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MICRO19 - Shining a light on movement

by Kristian Jensen and Rune Berg

To study how complex movements such as running and dancing is done, we use the spinal cord from turtles and look at the motor neurons that instruct the muscles for such actions. The neurons are stained green along the motor column of the spinal cord. A red dye is left as a trace from the location of our electrodes which we use to listen to the musical signal sent to the muscles to generate the intricate movements.

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MICRO20 - Dancing neurons

by Kristian Jensen and Rune Berg

To study how complex movements such as running and dancing is done, we use the spinal cord from turtles and look at the motor neurons that instruct the muscles for such actions. The neurons are stained green and stand like a row of ballet dancers in a column. The body of the neurons is 20 microns, approximately a tenth of the width of a hair. We cut the spinal cord a few microns thick and use a powerful microscope with a green laser to reveal the structure of the nervous system. The work is a collaboration between a medical doctor and a physicist at the Inst. of Neuroscience.

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MICRO21 - How brain juice is made

by Kristian Jensen and Katja Spiess

The brain floats in a complex liquid, let's just agree to call it 'brain juice'. We study how it is made and the barrier that protects the brain from an invasion of bacteria and viruses and separates it from the blood system. Here we have cells from the choroid plexus, that produce the brain juice, grown in a petri dish. The collection of cells in the dish mimic that of the organ in the brain and are call organoids. Here the outer layer of the cells has a channel (green) that allows the passage of water through the cells, and the cells DNA is orange in the middle of each cell. This image is a 2D image of six images on top of each other to create a 3D-like image. The 'brain juice' study is collaborative work by a team of doctors, pharmacologists and virologists.

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MICRO22 - Protecting the pancreas

by Kristian Jensen

The pancreas is protected by a transparent net of cells. The protective layer is thinner than a hair width and here coloured blue, while the core of the cells beneath is rainbow-coloured.

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MICRO23 - Minibrains in culture

by Regis Grailhe

The image shows iPS derived human neurons growth in 384 well plate. It was taken by High content microscopy at 3x 3 millimeters per motif. Neurons from Alzheimer’s patient were treated with various drugs to decrease Tau Phosphorylation. Regis Grailhe, Group Leader from the Institut Pasteur Korea.

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MINI1 - Pentafluoro benzene

by Ole John Nielsen

Pentafluoro benzene re-crystallization in vacuum. We begin with powder and end up with crystals as we are using the compound for atmospheric chemistry studies.

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MINI2 - Fiber structure Daphne 3

by Cathrine Ørskov

Handmade paper by artist Anne Vilsbøll, made with the fibrous inner bark of the Nepalese evergreen daphne plant. Lokta paper (the name of paper made with Daphne) has been made in the foothills of Himalaya for thousands of years. The paper was dyed with Aarwark color. The aim of the project was to study the fibre structure at low and high magnification to learn more about the properties of the material. This picture was photographed at low magnification using Zeiss axiocam camera mounted on my Leitz light microscope. The golden fibres in the center of the picture resemble a small fish swimming in the ocean surrounded by sea weed.

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MINI3 - Abaca fibers in paper

by Cathrine Ørskov

The picture shows fibres of handmade paper made by the artist Anne Vilsbøll. The paper was made using abaca fibres (family member of banana) and the paper was dyed with Aarwark colour. The aim of our project was to study the structure of the handmade paper at low and hig magnifications. This picture was taken at low magnification using Axiocam camera mounted on a Zeiss microscope. The paper structure resembles a iridescent blue and white web.

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MINI4 - Windmill of zebrafish

by Canan Doganli

I am a postdoc at University of Copenhagen. One of our projects focuses on primary cilia effect on vascular development. Here is a fluorescent microscopy image of 2 days old zebrafish, replicated in different color forms. I used a transgenic line marking the vasculature, which is visible in a contrast color in each single zebrafish image. I took the image using our Zeiss Axio Zoom.V16 microscope at ICMM, KU.

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MINI5 - Another day, another drop

by Mette Frandsen

This is a droplet of sample hanging in an KRÜSS DSA100. The scale is in mm-cm (the droplet itself is about 1 mm). I took the picture with my cell phone camera and it shows how we analyze the surface tension properties of different liquid samples via the Pendant Drop method. I solely took the picture because it looked good :-) I'm a Lab. technician working for Bioneer:FARMA at Department of Pharmacy at University of Copenhagen.

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MINI6 - Wrestling for life

by Rodrigo Pinheiro Bastos and Andrew Gordon Howe

While sampling soil in the middle of the Amazon forest, a very hairy bee landed on my leg, seeking my assistance. She was in agony, hopelessly enduring an attack by ants! Using my somewhat cumbersome pocketknife (6 cm blade), I tried to relieve her of the heavy, threatening burden - albeit unsuccessfully. Inevitably, in this wild life, we cannot fight against nature's cycle. Moreover, it is almost impossible to withstand the endless struggle against starvation experienced by the tiny soil engineers we know as ants. Therefore, this picture made me comprehend even more, just how important it is to view soil carbon dynamics from different perspectives - not only belowground, but also above the soil surface, where lots of wrestling for life influences soil carbon dynamics.

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MINI7 - Motor neurons in spinal cord

by Rune Berg

This is motor neurons in the spinal cord shown in green. Other neurons are shown in red. The scale is a couple of hundred microns across. The technique used is fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy with immunostaining of somas to understanding movement in general, where is it produced and how is it orchestrated. I’m Rune W. Berg (associate professor, Department of neuroscience).

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MINI8 - Beware of the crystal boogeyman

by Louise Fletcher Nikolajsen

Beware of the crystal boogeyman. The image shows a dehydrated drop of lipidic cubic phase consisting of lipid added a purified sample of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), a protein found in our brains. GPCRs are implicated in diseases like depression and schizophrenia and 34% of drugs on the market bind GPCRs in our body. In order to design new medicine we would like to know the structure of the protein, and therefore we aim at determining the structure of the GPCRs in our brains. For this we would like to produce protein crystals grown in lipidic cubic phase. However, for this sample, the surrounding buffer evaporated and it dried out. We used cross-polarized microscopy to take the picture and the size of the drop is 0.35 mm. The picture was taken by Louise Fletcher Nikolajsen, PhD student at Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology at University of Copenhagen.

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MINI9 - Black Magic

by Julia Sick

Rose hip petals (Rosa rugosa) heated at a constant temperature of 60 degrees for 42 days. The non-enzymatic chemical reaction between amino acids and reducing sugars – referred to as Maillard reaction – created unique flavor compounds reminding of honey, blackberry, balsamic vinegar, elderflower and apple. The reaction gave the petals a shiny surface as smooth as glass and colors spanning from orange to black purple. The Rose hip petals has a diameter of 11 cm. The experiment was conducted by former Head of Culinary Research & Development Roberto Flore from Nordic Food Lab. The research purpose was to create unique flavors by combining scientific approaches with culinary techniques from around the world. I’m Julia Sick – Research Assistant at Department of Food Science at Section Design and Consumer Behavior.

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MINI10 - The Death Grip

by Julia Sick

Red wood ant (Formica rufa) infected by the insect-pathogenizing fungus Ophiocordyceps unilateralis that changes the behavioral patterns of the ant. The fungus forces the ant to bite with its mandibles into a pine needle. Once the mandibles grip the needle, the ant loses control of its mandible muscles as the fungus destroys the ant’s muscle fibers. Consequently, the mandibles remain fixed in place – called the death grip. The size of red wood ant is 6 mm. The picture was taken on a foraging trip with the Nordic Food Lab to the Bidstrup forests (Sealand) to explore the edible potential of the Nordic region. Formica rufa is known for its unique acidic and orange-like flavor. I’m Julia Sick – Research Assistant at Department of Food Science at Section Design and Consumer Behavior.

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MINI11 - Monitoring the activity of cells at the speed of electricity

by Jean-Francois Perrier

Following the activity of living cells in real time is a challenge for biologist. The advent of modern electrophysiology has rendered it possible. The patch clamp technique allows the measurements of currents through ion channels in the cell membrane with a time resolution of microseconds. Pictured are two microelectrodes positioned on a recording chamber illuminated by epifluorescence microscopy (green light). The tip of the electrodes is sufficiently small (diameter < 1µm) to record the electrical activity of single cells such as neurons or glial cells. In the lab, we use electrophysiology to investigate how these two cell types interact.

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MINI12 - Colony attack

by Rasmus Skytte Eriksen

A stereomicroscope image of a “plaque”, a hole with radius ~1mm formed by viruses in an agar gel containing bacterial colonies. Each colony, which appears as a white dot, consists of up to 10,000,000 bacteria, and results from the proliferation of a single bacterium trapped in the gel one day earlier. The plaque was formed by viruses that can infect bacteria, kill them, and spread to their neighbors. The center of the plaque is where the first virus infected a bacterium, and the colonies closer to the edge of the plaque experienced virus attacks at later times. Through collaboration between Svenningsen's group (Biology) and Mitarai's group (NBI), Eriksen et al. showed that there is a critical colony size above which the bacterial growth in the core of the colony can overwhelm the killing by virus on the surface. Image courtesy of Katrine Faxøe Nannestad.

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MINI13 - A fierce tiny dragon

by Christina Lynggaard

Pterygodermatites baiomydis is a nematode parasite (rundorm in danish) found in the intestine of mice. As part of a project with the aim to study parasites of wild mice, I worked with different mice species and was very lucky to find this worm in Bayomis tailori, which turned out to be a new species to science. Resembling a dragon with its amazing spines, it is diminutive in size which is fortunate for man-kind. The males are only 3 mm but females can be up to 7 times the male's length (21 mm). They both have 2 rows of spines and females have up to 75 spines in each row. Due to its size, this photo was taken with an electron microscope. PhD fellow Christina Lynggaard, Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark.

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MINI14 - Dancing mites

by Christina Lynggaard

These mites (mide in danish) belong to the Leaelapidae family and are parasites living on the fur of mice. They are very small and are only visible when seen through a microscope. These photos were taken using an optical microscope during my Master's thesis. I wanted to investigate if the amount and/or type of parasites were related to what the mice were eating by analysing the isotopes in their hair (Carbon and Nitrogen). Even though I removed these mites from the mice, they did not seem to care... PhD fellow Christina Lynggaard, Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark.

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MINI15 - Who you gonna to call? Ghost busters!

by Christina Lynggaard

This female worm may seem to be taken directly from a horror movie, but it is real and lives inside the intestine of mice. Its name is Pterygodermatites baiomydis and luckily it can only be as big as 21mm long and has only been found inside mice in Mexico. This photo was taken with an electron microscope and allows us to see its amazing head, with 18 teeth in the margin of the mouth and 3 deeper in its esophagous. I found this parasite while I was a working on a project that researched on the parasite diversity of wild rodents. Amazingly, this angry looking nematode (rundorm in danish) turned out to be a new species. You may be amazed by tiny animals, if you give yourself the time to look carefully. PhD fellow Christina Lynggaard, Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark.

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MINI16 - Insect Nebula

by Helena Augusta Lisboa de Oliveira

Resistors are components so common in electronics that they often go unnoticed. In the picture we can see resistors horizontally illuminated. The light diffracts and strikes the surface they are on, which brings us to landscapes of the night sky, like nebulae. The thin and light rods resemble insect legs. The scale is centimeters. The photo was made with digital camera, and the colors were adjusted for the cyan. These resistors were used in a research of physics teaching on arduino with Gabriel Rodrigues. I am Helena Augusta Lisboa de Oliveira, doctoral researcher in Chemical and Biological Technologies at the University of Brasília.

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MINI17 - Insect Nebula

by Helena Augusta Lisboa de Oliveira

This GIF presents a set of resistors being illuminated horizontally in different positions. Electrical resistors are central components in any electronic design. The shadow produced and its movement can produce the impression of something alive and mysterious. And in some moments, the light diffracts and strikes the surface they are on. The scale is centimeters. The video was made with digital camera. These resistors were used in a research of physics teaching on arduino with Gabriel Rodrigues. I am Helena Augusta Lisboa de Oliveira, doctoral researcher in Chemical and Biological Technologies at the University of Brasilia, Brazil.

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MINI18 - Pathways in the human brain

by Henrik Groenholt Jensen

Diffusion-weighted MRI is used to non-invasively trace neuronal pathways by following the flow of hydrogen protons as they diffuse within and around cells. Here, we see a cross-section of the brain bridge, the corpus callosum, connecting its two hemispheres. The coloured glyphs indicate the measured direction of the diffusion along fiber pathways. By following this movement of water, we get an indication of how the brain is "wired" through the white matter fiber tracts connecting the "computational units" of the grey matter neurons. My name is Henrik G. Jensen and a recent PhD graduate from Computer Science. I have been working on the complex task of comparing diffusion-weighted images by creating spatial maps between scans, profiling groups and the temporal and/or pathological evolution in single subjects.

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MINI19 - Pathways in the human brain (2)

by Henrik Groenholt Jensen

Diffusion-weighted MRI is used to non-invasively trace neuronal pathways by following the flow of hydrogen protons as they diffuse within and around cells. Here, we see a side-view of pathways in the brain, coloured by the orientation of the fibers. One such is the blue pathways moving up from the brain stem and radiating out. By following this movement of water, we get an indication of how the brain is "wired" through the white matter fiber tracts connecting the "computational units" of the grey matter neurons. My name is Henrik G. Jensen and a recent PhD graduate from Computer Science. I have been working on the complex task of comparing diffusion-weighted images by creating spatial maps between scans, profiling groups and the temporal and/or pathological evolution in single subjects.

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MINI20 - Pathways in the human brain (3)

by Henrik Groenholt Jensen

Diffusion-weighted MRI is used to non-invasively trace neuronal pathways by following the flow of hydrogen protons as they diffuse within and around cells. Here, we see a top-view of pathways in the brain, coloured by the orientation of the fibers. We see how the two hemispheres of the brain are a mesh of complex fiber tracts. By following this movement of water, we get an indication of how the brain is "wired" through the white matter fiber tracts connecting the "computational units" of the grey matter neurons. My name is Henrik G. Jensen and a recent PhD graduate from Computer Science. I have been working on the complex task of comparing diffusion-weighted images by creating spatial maps between scans, profiling groups and the temporal and/or pathological evolution in single subjects.

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MINI21 - Pathways in the human brain (4)

by Henrik Groenholt Jensen

Diffusion-weighted MRI is used to non-invasively trace neuronal pathways by following the flow of hydrogen protons as they diffuse within and around cells. Here, we see a frontal view of pathways in the brain, coloured by the orientation of the fibers. By following this movement of water, we get an indication of how the brain is "wired" through the white matter fiber tracts connecting the "computational units" of the grey matter neurons. My name is Henrik G. Jensen and a recent PhD graduate from Computer Science. I have been working on the complex task of comparing diffusion-weighted images by creating spatial maps between scans, profiling groups and the temporal and/or pathological evolution in single subjects.

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MINI22 - Pathways in the human brain (5)

by Henrik Groenholt Jensen

Diffusion-weighted MRI is used to non-invasively trace neuronal pathways by following the flow of hydrogen protons as they diffuse within and around cells. Here, we see an illustration of the pathways coloured by the anistropy of the diffusion, where the major fiber tract "highways" of the brain are seen as red/hot. By following this movement of water, we get an indication of how the brain is "wired" through the white matter fiber tracts connecting the "computational units" of the grey matter neurons. My name is Henrik G. Jensen and a recent PhD graduate from Computer Science. I have been working on the complex task of comparing diffusion-weighted images by creating spatial maps between scans, profiling groups and the temporal and/or pathological evolution in single subjects.

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MINI23 - Psychedelic foram on the half-shell

by Dirk Müter

The picture shows a 3D model of half a foraminifera shell recorded by synchrotron based CT scanning (SPring-8, Japan) with the local shell thickness as color code. Forams are an important part of the marine food web and a sink of CO2 but their ability to form their shells is threatened by ocean acidification. In an EU funded project in collaboration with Lund University (H. Filipsson and L. Charrieau) we set out to quantify the loss of shell thickness over the foram fossil record preserved in marine sediments which will tells us how big the impact of human industrial activity on these organisms already is and how their future might look like.

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MACRO1 - Horny for Poaceae

by Physilia Chua

This is a portrait of an Ibex grazing in the Italian Alps. Picture taken with a Nikon D90. I was studying the effects of climate change on the grazing patterns of ibex. I'm a PhD student enrolled at the Natural History Museum of Denmark.

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MACRO2 - Too sheepy to smile

by Physilia Chua

Just a sheep in a stream, cooling its feet under the hot sun. It was an opportunistic picture that I captured while studying other types of mammals in the alps. I guess you could say this photo captures the science of alpine mammal ecology.

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MACRO3 - Intruder alert!!!

by Physilia Chua

An alpine marmot screeches at the top of its tiny lungs, warning the rest of its colony of my presence. Guess my study on their adaptation to human disturbance went quite well.

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MACRO4 - Stripes

by Helle Astrid Kjær

On the Greenland ice sheet we have established a camp (EastGRIP) to do ice core drillings, which can inform on past climate. In order to easy access the drilling caves underneath the surface a Pistenbully makes the surface flat for us leaving behind these stripes.

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MACRO5 - White surface

by Helle Astrid Kjær

At Greenland we study the surface snow for chemical impurities that can inform on deposition of aerosols from forest fires and volcanoes. Prior to scooping the sample the surface is disturbed only by wind.

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MACRO6 - Circle and lines

by Helle Astrid Kjær

In Greenland we drill ice cores to study the climate of the past 100000 yrs. After retrieval from dee in the Greenland ice sheet, we cut them up to transport them back for further analysis that can inform about past temperatures, accumulation, CO2, as well as more than 20 more proxies for climate change.

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MACRO7 - Time Projection Chamber

by Tuva Richert

100 meters underground, inside a 4000 tonnes magnet, infront of the instrument Time Projection Chamber, I am about to climb down the detector to replace damaged electronics. The Time Projection Chamber is a sub-detector of the ALICE experiment at CERN, which is responsible for reconstructing thousands of particles coming out of the accelerator Large Hadron Collider particle collisions where “Little Bangs” are created to study the form of matter that existed just after Big Bang – the Quark Gluon Plasma. I am a postdoc researcher at Niels Bohr Institute, Experimental Particle Physics, working with analysing data from the collisions we record with the ALICE detector in order to characterize the Quark Gluon Plasma.

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MACRO8 - A snake leaving the x-ray table

by Anna Müller

This is a photo of a snake having medical imaging performed. The boa snake was brought to the Vet School in Copenhagen to have x-rays performed. There was a suspicion that the snake had troubles laying eggs. Boa snakes belong to the family Boidae, which are non-venomous. Instead, they kill their prey by constriction. Snakes prefer to grab something in the surroundings, for example a branch of a tree, so the flat x-ray table was not ideal for this female! She constantly explored her surroundings. The x-ray machine is visible in the upper right part of the image. Submitted by Anna Müller, a veterinarian in the Veterinary Imaging Section of the University Hospital for Companion Animals.

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MACRO9 - No two leaves alike

by Yi Yang

Patterns of entropy production in developing branching systems. These transportive structures are ubiquitous in biology and hydrology, combining good perfusability with high interfacial area across a wide spectrum of scales, from micrometres (organs in higher organisms) to kilometres (rivers and basins). Shown features are simulation results using a dimensionless mathematical model. The model describes a phenomenon analogous to the Matthew Effect in sociology (the rich get richer and the poor get poorer). The dynamic process is fully deterministic and the apparent randomness stems from the stochastic nature of external perturbations, to which a developing structure is very sensitive. The specific surface area of all shown images converges to ~1.62/m, the golden ratio. The colour indicates the magnitude of entropy production rate (yellow means greater).

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MACRO10 - The haunter of the dark

by Roberta Kamei Rodrigues

The picture shows drops of a water-soluble black dye dripping on a beaker with water. However, the density of the dye is higher than the density of the water. So it is possible to observe the dye goes straight to the bottom of the beaker, but, it also dissolves in the path. The photo was taken with a compact camera within a short distance of the 100 mL beaker, by Roberta Kamei Rodrigues, postdoctoral researcher at Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro.

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MACRO11 - Honey on the rheometer plate

by Roberta Kamei Rodrigues

The picture shows honey on a rheometer plate. A rheometer is a laboratory device used to measure the way in which fluids flow in response to applied forces. Honey is an example of Newtonian fluid (a fluid whose viscosity does not change with the rate of deformation or shear stain). The cross hatched plates prevent sliding between the plates and the samples. The photo was taken with a compact camera within a short distance of the rheometer plate, by Roberta Kamei Rodrigues, postdoctoral researcher at Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro.

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MACRO12 - Green storm

by Roberta Kamei Rodrigues

The picture was taken immediately after addition of the polyacrylamide polymer and a water-soluble green dye in a beaker with water and glycerin. The polyacrylamide solution is an example of viscoelastic fluid (viscoelastic materials exhibit both viscous and elastic characteristics when undergoing deformation, that is, they have elements of both of these properties and, as such, exhibit time-dependent strain). The photo was taken with a compact camera within a short distance of the beaker, by Roberta Kamei Rodrigues, postdoctoral researcher at Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro.

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MACRO13 - Drops of oil in water

by Roberta Kamei Rodrigues

The picture shows water and mineral oil with an oil-soluble red dye. Water and oil are usually immiscible. However, when immiscible liquids are placed in the same vessel and stirred, drops of one liquid immersed in the other can be momentarily created. In this case, oil drops immersed in water were formed. The photo was taken from the top of the vessel, by Roberta Kamei Rodrigues, postdoctoral researcher at Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro.

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MACRO14 - Eruption

by Roldan Medina de Guia

I am Roldan Medina de Guia or simply Dan. I work as a postdoc at The Novo Nordisk Foundation - Center for Basic Metabolic Research of the University of Copenhagen. This image is a part of my so-called “Project Trockeneis” where I photograph the motifs formed by the clouds exploding from the combination of dry ice and water. Dry ice is carbon dioxide in solid form and is one of the most commonly used cooling and preservation agents in food and beverage industries and in scientific research. This is photography in the macroscopic scale taken with Olympus Pen-EPL2; ISO200, f/4.5; Image processed with Adobe Photoshop.

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MACRO15 - Altocumulus

by Roldan Medina de Guia

I am Roldan Medina de Guia or simply Dan. I work as a postdoc at The Novo Nordisk Foundation - Center for Basic Metabolic Research of the University of Copenhagen. This image is a part of my so-called “Project Trockeneis” where I photograph the motifs formed by the clouds exploding from the combination of dry ice and water. Dry ice is carbon dioxide in solid form and is one of the most commonly used cooling and preservation agents in food and beverage industries and in scientific research. This is photography in the macroscopic scale taken with Olympus Pen-EPL2; ISO200, f/4.5; Image processed with Adobe Photoshop.

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MACRO16 - Denmark Unleashed

by Roldan Medina de Guia

I am Roldan Medina de Guia or simply Dan. I work as a postdoc at The Novo Nordisk Foundation - Center for Basic Metabolic Research of the University of Copenhagen. This image is a part of my so-called “Project Trockeneis” where I photograph the motifs formed by the clouds exploding from the combination of dry ice and water. Dry ice is carbon dioxide in solid state and is one of the most commonly used cooling and preservation agents in food and beverage industries and in scientific research. This is a composition made by combining different clouds I photographed to form the outline of Denmark. This is photography in the macroscopic scale taken with Olympus Pen-EPL2; ISO200, f/4.5; Image processed with Adobe Photoshop.

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MACRO17 - Soap people holding hands and dancing in a circle

by Roberta Kamei Rodrigues

The picture shows two liquid surfactants in a beaker. One is transparent, of lower density, in smaller quantity. The other is yellow, of higher density, in greater quantity. It is possible to see that the transparent surfactant moves to the top of the beaker and the yellow surfactant goes to the bottom. While moving, the transparent surfactant acquires a shape that resembles people holding hands and dancing in a circle. The photo was taken with a compact camera within a short distance of the beaker, by Roberta Kamei Rodrigues, postdoctoral researcher at Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro.

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MACRO18 - Wormy Work

by Martin Nielsen

This is a sample of intestinal worms from a single salmon collected at a salmon farm in Norway. These worms are not at all uncommon in salmons. This sample along with many more are part of a project looking into how we can increase the overall health of salmons in aqua culture.

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MACRO19 - Going Fishing

by Martin Nielsen

Fieldwork is often way harder than imagined. But sometimes it is just amazing with fantastic weather, great views and good people. Here we are about to “set sails” into the sunrise of a Norwegian fjord collecting salmons. The picture is a combination of three pictures, a technique called HDR (High Dynamic Range) which can be used to capture more details when the motive has very different light settings.

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MACRO20 - Excitation volume

by Liridon Aliti

The image visualizes the double-coned excitation volume of a highly concentrated fluorescein solution imaged by a water immersion objective. The scale is centimeters. The technique used to capture it was a conventional wide-field microscope. Fluorescein is a commonly available cheap organic fluorescent dye that is excited with blue light and emits greenish light. My name is Liridon Aliti and I am a PhD student at University of Copenhagen.

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MACRO21 - 384 hues of cell signaling

by Thor C. Møller

This picture shows a 384-well microplate (9 cm x 13 cm) used for drug screening and for delineating cell signaling pathways. Cell-to-cell communication is crucial for all human functions. These signals, e.g. hormones or neurotransmitters, are detected by receptors in the receiving cells that initiates the cellular response. My research is focused on this mechanism for the physiologically and pharmacologically most important class of receptors, G protein-coupled receptors. The bottom of the microplate in the picture contains a waveguide with a cell-compatible coating. Light reflected from the waveguide is sensitive to the behavior of cells grown on it. This phenomenon can be used as a non-invasive, unbiased way of probing cell signaling, but is also very pretty to look at. The picture was taken with a Canon EOS 7D. Thor C. Møller, postdoc at Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen.

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MACRO22 - Blue Sky Research

by Thor C. Møller

This picture shows a 384-well microplate (9 cm x 13 cm) used for drug screening and for delineating cell signaling pathways. Cell-to-cell communication is crucial for all human functions. These signals, e.g. hormones or neurotransmitters, are detected by receptors in the receiving cells that initiates the cellular response. My research is focused on this mechanism for the physiologically and pharmacologically most important class of receptors, G protein-coupled receptors. The bottom of the microplate in the picture contains a waveguide with a cell-compatible coating. Light reflected from the waveguide is sensitive to the behavior of cells grown on it. This phenomenon can be used as a non-invasive, unbiased way of probing cell signaling, but is also very pretty to look at. The picture was taken with a Canon EOS 7D. Thor C. Møller, postdoc at Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen.

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MACRO23 - Engaging birds

by Jonas drotner Mouritsen and Ole G. Mouritsen

Beaks of squid (Loligo forbesii) photographed on a black and reflecting surface of a stove. Scale: Max 25 cm. Technique: ordinary photography with digital camera. Research relation: Investigation of the gastrophysics of Danish squid. Contributers: photographer: Jonas Drotner Mouritsen (Chromascope); scientist: professor Ole G. Mouritsen (Department of Food Science, University of Copenhagen).English Cephalopods, specifically Coleoidea (squid, octopus, and cuttlefish), have for millennia been used as marine food by humans across the world and across different food cultures. It is particularly the mantle, the arms, the ink, and part of the intestines such as the liver that have been used. In addition to being consumed in the fresh and raw states, the various world cuisines have prepared cephalopods by a wide range of culinary techniques, such as boiling and steaming, frying, grilling, marinating, smoking, drying, and fermenting. Cephalopods are generally good nutritional sources of proteins, minerals, omega-3 fatty acids, as well as micronutrients, and their fat content is low. Whereas being part of the common fare in, e.g., Southeast Asia and Southern Europe, cephalopods are seldom used in regional cuisines in, e.g., North America and Northern Europe although the local waters there often have abundant sources of specific species that are edible. There is, however, an increasing interest among chefs and gastroscientists to source local waters in a more diverse and sustainably fashion, including novel uses of cephalopods to counterbalance the dwindling fisheries of bonefish, and to identify new protein sources to replace meat from land-animal production. Combining these trends in gastronomic development with the observation that the global populations of cephalopods are on the rise holds an interesting promise for the future. There are three main groups of cephalopods: octopus, torpedo-shaped, and sepia-like, and they have only few hard part in their body. The octopus has a hard beak made of chitin, the torpedo-shaped has additionally a so-called sword (gladius) made of chitin, and the sepia-like has a beak of chitin and a calcareous backbone (cuttlebone). As part of a multidisciplinary research project on the gastrophysics and culinary applications of cephalopods, a number of photographic images were made of both the hard and soft parts of Danish squid.

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MACRO24 - Swords fighting

by Jonas Drotner Mouritsen and Ole G. Mouritsen

Squid-gladius-0487.jpg ‘Swords fighting’ The gladiuses (chitin backbones) of squids (Loligo forbesii) photographed on a black and reflecting surface of a stove. Scale: Max 2 cm Technique: ordinary photography with digital camera. Research relation: Investigation of the gastrophysics of Danish squid. Contributers: photographer: Jonas Drotner Mouritsen, Chromascope; scientist: professor Ole G. Mouritsen, Department of Food Science, University of Copenhagen.English Cephalopods, specifically Coleoidea (squid, octopus, and cuttlefish), have for millennia been used as marine food by humans across the world and across different food cultures. It is particularly the mantle, the arms, the ink, and part of the intestines such as the liver that have been used. In addition to being consumed in the fresh and raw states, the various world cuisines have prepared cephalopods by a wide range of culinary techniques, such as boiling and steaming, frying, grilling, marinating, smoking, drying, and fermenting. Cephalopods are generally good nutritional sources of proteins, minerals, omega-3 fatty acids, as well as micronutrients, and their fat content is low. Whereas being part of the common fare in, e.g., Southeast Asia and Southern Europe, cephalopods are seldom used in regional cuisines in, e.g., North America and Northern Europe although the local waters there often have abundant sources of specific species that are edible. There is, however, an increasing interest among chefs and gastroscientists to source local waters in a more diverse and sustainably fashion, including novel uses of cephalopods to counterbalance the dwindling fisheries of bonefish, and to identify new protein sources to replace meat from land-animal production. Combining these trends in gastronomic development with the observation that the global populations of cephalopods are on the rise holds an interesting promise for the future. There are three main groups of cephalopods: octopus, torpedo-shaped, and sepia-like, and they have only few hard part in their body. The octopus has a hard beak made of chitin, the torpedo-shaped has additionally a so-called sword (gladius) made of chitin, and the sepia-like has a beak of chitin and a calcareous backbone (cuttlebone). As part of a multidisciplinary research project on the gastrophysics and culinary applications of cephalopods, a number of photographic images were made of both the hard and soft parts of Danish squid.

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MACRO25 - Infinite spiral

by Line Kræmer

I present to you a common snake millipede approximately 2-3 cm long. The snake millipede was found under a log, cleaned and placed in my homemade portable photo-studio where I did a single shot with a Canon 5D, a 100 mm macro lens and two speed light flashes of the calm model. The fella was gently released back under the log after the photo session. Finally, the photo will be used in a digital identification tool called Bugdex for 1st year Biology students at KU. My name is Line Kræmer and I’m a MSc. student at Biology and I have been working with Bugdex with two co-workers from the department of Biosystematics at the Natural History Museum of Denmark for almost 5 years now. I decided to do my MSc. thesis about Bugdex and the influence it has on students and their ability to learn through digitalized teaching material.

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MACRO26 - Rainbow runaway

by Line Kræmer

I present to you a cuckoo wasp approximately 1 cm long. The little flying jewel was caught by net, gently cooled down and shot with a Canon 5D, a 100 mm macro lens and two speed light flashes quickly before it understood what was going on. Afterwards, the cuckoo wasp was released back into nature. Finally, the photo will be used in a digital identification tool called Bugdex for 1st year Biology students at KU. My name is Line Kræmer and I’m a MSc. student at Biology and I have been working with Bugdex with two co-workers from the department of Biosystematics at the Natural History Museum of Denmark for almost 5 years now. I decided to do my MSc. thesis about Bugdex and the influence it has on students and their ability to learn through digitalized teaching material.

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MACRO27 - Tongue maintenance

by Line Kræmer

I present to you a bumblebee approximately 2 cm long. This buzzing lady was caught by net while she was busy visiting flowers for pollen and nectar. After cooling her down a little, she was photographed with a Canon 5D, a 100 mm macro lens and two speed light flashes. Afterwards, she was released safely back to her busy life. Finally, the photo will be used in a digital identification tool called Bugdex for 1st year Biology students at KU. My name is Line Kræmer and I’m a MSc. student at Biology and I have been working with Bugdex with two co-workers from the department of Biosystematics at the Natural History Museum of Denmark for almost 5 years now. I decided to do my MSc. thesis about Bugdex and the influence it has on students and their ability to learn through digitalized teaching material.

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MACRO28 - Rainy viola

by Line Kræmer

I present to you a violet ground beetle approximately 3 cm long. This lovely lady was caught under a log waiting for her next prey. She had to be cooled down a little to cooperate for her photo. She was photographed with a Canon 5D, a 100 mm macro lens and two speed light flashes. She was released back under her log afterwards. Finally, the photo will be used in a digital identification tool called Bugdex for 1st year Biology students at KU. My name is Line Kræmer and I’m a MSc. student at Biology and I have been working with Bugdex with two co-workers from the department of Biosystematics at the Natural History Museum of Denmark for almost 5 years now. I decided to do my MSc. thesis about Bugdex and the influence it has on students and their ability to learn through digitalized teaching material.

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MACRO29 - Red rover

by Line Kræmer

I present to you a rove beetle (Platydracus stercorarius) approximately 1.3 cm long. This little beetle was caught by hand, cooled down and photographed with a Canon 5D, a 100 mm macro lens and two speed light flashes. I had to provoke it a bit to get the ‘tail’ raised for a nice shot of the classic rove beetle position. It was released without harm afterwards. Finally, the photo will be used in a digital identification tool called Bugdex for 1st year Biology students at KU. My name is Line Kræmer and I’m a MSc. student at Biology and I have been working with Bugdex with two co-workers from the department of Biosystematics at the Natural History Museum of Denmark for almost 5 years now. I decided to do my MSc. thesis about Bugdex and the influence it has on students and their ability to learn through digitalized teaching material.

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MACRO30 - The Fibonacci Aloe

by Louise Isager Ahl

Aloe polyphylla, a plant species native to Lesotho. Aloe polyphylla is 1 of nearly 100 species of Aloes in my Phd project. I am investigating the sugar composition of their succulent tissue. The aim of my project is to figure out if Aloe vera is the best Aloe for medicinal use or if there is another Aloe out there that could potentially be better.

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MACRO31 - Floral beauty

by Louise Isager Ahl

Aloe arborescens. An aloe tree native to South Africa. As part of my PhD project I need to collect flowers of all the species I use. These have to be pressed and dried and submitted to the Herbarium. Aloe arborescens is widely used in Asia in the same way as Aloe vera. Aloe arborescens is 1 of nearly 100 species of Aloes in my PhD project. I am investigating the sugar composition of their succulent tissue. The aim of my project is to figure out if Aloe vera is the best Aloe for medicinal use or if there is another Aloe out there that could potentially be better.

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MACRO32 - Challenges

by Louise Isager Ahl

Aloe ferox. A tree aloe native to South Africa. As part of my PhD project I need to collect flowers and leaves of all the species I use. These have to be pressed and dried and submitted to the Herbarium. Sometimes this task is a lot more challenging than it sounds. Aloe ferox is used medicinally in the same way as Aloe vera, and is sometimes substituted for Aloe vera in "Aloe vera" products. Aloe ferox is one of nearly 100 species of Aloes in my Phd project. I am investigating the sugar composition of their succulent tissue. The aim of my project is to figure out if Aloe vera is the best Aloe for medicinal use or if there is another Aloe out there that could potentially be better.

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MACRO33 - What is in there?

by Louise Isager Ahl

The one and only Aloe vera. Known by most as something you add to your aftersun lotion, your shampoo, your soap, your drink... your anything. Here I am trying to measure the water content of the leaf as part of a study on succulence. I am investigating nearly 100 different species of Aloes in my Phd project. I measuring the sugar composition of their succulent tissue. The aim of my project is to figure out if Aloe vera is the best Aloe for medicinal use or if there is another Aloe out there that could potentially be better.

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MACRO34 - Inside the gut

by Patrik Lundquist

The images show green fluorescent nanoparticles loaded with insulin that are being absorbed by the epithelium, the lining cells, of the human small intestine. Drugs based on peptides and proteins are generating much interest today and promises new treatments for very serious diseases. However, peptides and proteins are not absorbed in intact form but are broken down in the intestine. Encapsulation of peptide drugs in a nanoparticle is a possible way that could allow easy oral administration of such drug and avoid having to inject them. Intestinal tissues were donated by patients undergoing gastric bypass surgery and mounted in Ussing chambers, developed by Hans Ussing, University of Copenhagen, in the fifties. In these organ baths the tissue can be kept alive for several hours while we study the absorption and permeability mechanisms of drugs and nanoparticles. The immunofluorescent image was acquired on a ZEISS ELYRA S.1.

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MACRO35 - Parasitic symmetry

by Christina Lynggaard

This is the head of the tapeworm (bændelorm in danish) Hydatigena taeniaeformis and was found living inside the liver of a mouse in Kongelunden, Denmark. It is only a few cm long when inside the mouse, but when it is eaten by a cat, it becomes an adult and can be up to 60 cm long. This worm uses its head full of hooks to penetrate the intestine to ensure a comfortable and secure life inside the cat. This photo was taken with an optical microscope while doing my Master's thesis. The aim was to study the correlation between parasites and the diet of mice, based on the isotopes (Carbon and Nitrogen) that they had on their hair. PhD fellow Christina Lynggaard, Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark.

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MACRO36 - Mmmm.. that's so monkeylicious!

by Physilia Chua

The bali long-tail macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are famous robbers. Nearby food stalls and unsuspecting tourists often fall prey to these cheeky monkeys. Here, a young juvenile can be seen enjoying his ‘fruits of labour’ which he has probably pilfered from an angry stall owner. I was there to study their interesting social behaviour and interaction with humans.

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MACRO37 - Pine-ning for peace

by Physilia Chua

While hiking through the Black forest on my vegetation monitoring field trip, I heard a duck calling longingly in the distance. Abandoning common sense and my assigned GPS coordinates, I wandered to the edge of this lake and took in the tranquility of the landscape. There, I found the source of the haunting call and thought to myself.. this is how you lose yourself to the woods.

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